Measure for Measure

by: William Shakespeare

  Act 5 Scene 1

page Act 5 Scene 1 Page 16

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DUKE VINCENTIO

370(To Provost) Stay, sir; stay awhile.

DUKE VINCENTIO

(to the Provost) Wait, sir, stay a minute.

ANGELO

What, resists he? Help him, Lucio.

ANGELO

Is he resisting arrest? Help the provost, Lucio.

LUCIO

Come, sir; come, sir; come, sir; foh, sir! Why, you
bald-pated, lying rascal, you must be hooded, must
you? Show your knave’s visage, with a pox to you!
375show your sheep-biting face, and be hanged an hour!
Will’t not off?

LUCIO

Come on, sir. Come on, sir. Come on, sir. Ugh! So, you bald, lying rascal, you want to keep your hood on, do you? Show your lowlife face, damn you! Show your thieving face, and be hanged in an hour! Won’t it come off?
Pulls off the friar’s hood, and discovers DUKE VINCENTIO
He pulls off the friar’s hood, revealing DUKE VINCENTIO.

DUKE VINCENTIO

Thou art the first knave that e’er madest a duke.
First, provost, let me bail these gentle three. (To LUCIO) Sneak not away, sir; for the friar and you
Must have a word anon. Lay hold on him.

DUKE VINCENTIO

You’re the first lowlife to ever turn someone into a duke.
First, provost, let me free these three gentle people. (to LUCIO) Don’t you sneak away, sir. The friar and you will have a chat later on. Hold him.

LUCIO

380This may prove worse than hanging.

LUCIO

This may turn out worse than hanging.

DUKE VINCENTIO

(To ESCALUS) What you have spoke I pardon: sit you down:
We’ll borrow place of him. (To ANGELO) Sir, by your leave.
Hast thou or word, or wit, or impudence,
That yet can do thee office? If thou hast,
385Rely upon it till my tale be heard,
And hold no longer out.

DUKE VINCENTIO

(to ESCALUS) I forgive the things you said to me. Sit down. We’ll take Angelo’s seat. (to ANGELO) Sir, if I may. Do you have any words, either intelligent or impudent, that can help you? If so, keep them until I tell my story. Don’t hold the truth back any longer.

ANGELO

O my dread lord,
I should be guiltier than my guiltiness,
To think I can be undiscernible,
390When I perceive your grace, like power divine,
Hath look’d upon my passes. Then, good prince,
No longer session hold upon my shame,
But let my trial be mine own confession:
Immediate sentence then and sequent death
395Is all the grace I beg.

ANGELO

Oh my dreaded lord, I’d be even more guilty to think I could go undiscovered, now that I realize your grace, like some divine power, has seen my sins. So, good prince, stop inquiring about my shame. Let my confession count as my trial. I beg only for the mercy of an immediate sentence and then death.

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