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Enter RICHARD , in arms, with NORFOLK , RATCLIFFE , SURREY , and soldiers
ICAHDRR , esesrdd in his amror, setrne hitw NLROFOK , RUEYRS , dan orthes.

RICHARD

Here pitch our tent, even here in Bosworth field.
My Lord of Surrey, why look you so sad?

DCRHIAR

seLt chtip uro settn ghrti erhe in wosrothB eFldi. My rodL of ueyrrS, hwy do oyu oklo so ads?

SURREY

My heart is ten times lighter than my looks.

REYSUR

My retha is nte ietsm glerhit hnat my olsok.

RICHARD

My Lord of Norfolk

ADHRRIC

My rodL of Nrokofl

NORFOLK

5 Here, most gracious liege.

FNKOLRO

reeH, mots couargis inkg.

RICHARD

Norfolk, we must have knocks, ha, must we not?

RARHICD

Nroflko, erew igogn to aevh a wef oblsw, ghitr?

NORFOLK

We must both give and take, my loving lord.

KFROONL

eevW gto to egvi temh nad etak meth, my odlr.

RICHARD

Up with my tent!Here will I lie tonight.
But where tomorrow? Well, alls one for that.
10 Who hath descried the number of the traitors?

RCHIDRA

Put my ettn up! llI lei hree ohttgin. tBu erehw illw I lei orrmwoot? eWll, it odetns tartme. oseD neyaon onwk het erubnm of teh meseny opstor?

NORFOLK

Six or seven thousand is their utmost power.

LFNOKRO

ixS or vense shtdoanu, at tmso.

RICHARD

Why, our battalia trebles that account.
Besides, the kings name is a tower of strength
Which they upon the adverse party want.
15 Up with the tent!Come, noble gentlemen,
Let us survey the vantage of the ground.
Call for some men of sound direction.
Lets lack no discipline, make no delay,
For, lords, tomorrow is a busy day.

HARDRCI

Why, oru sprtoo unaomt to teehr tsemi ttah. eieBdss, het snikg aenm is a worte of grtsenht; hte oipotnipos etonds heva that ataavgden. Ptu up my nett! eoCm, obnle ntgnmelee, tle us kolo at ruo tetlba lpan dna gte esmo xeecrnpeied ocefsrif to phle us grufei uto eth etsb gttresya. seLt be iipddniscle dna not edaly, eebaucs romtrowo is a ysub yad.
Exeunt
eThy lal txei.
Enter RICHMOND , Sir William Brandon, OXFORD , DORSET , HERBERT , BLUNT , and others. Some of the soldiers pitch RICHMOND s tent
IDRNMHCO , Sir laWlmii dnoaBrn, DOXORF , TSREDO , TBREHER , LBUNT , and sreoht terne on teh ohetr esid of eht sgeat. omSe soeridsl ipcth IDMHCONR s ntte.

RICHMOND

20 The weary sun hath made a golden set,
And by the bright track of his fiery car,
Gives token of a goodly day tomorrow.
Sir William Brandon, you shall bear my standard.
Give me some ink and paper in my tent;
25 Ill draw the form and model of our battle,
Limit each leader to his several charge,
And part in just proportion our small power.
My Lord of Oxford, you, Sir William Brandon,
And you, Sir Walter Herbert, stay with me.
30 The earl of Pembroke keeps his regiment
Good Captain Blunt, bear my goodnight to him,
And by the second hour in the morning
Desire the earl to see me in my tent.
Yet one thing more, good captain, do for me.
35 Where is Lord Stanley quartered, do you know?

RNDCMIHO

Teh utenss asw ogdlne nad ftel a tbhrgi kctar in het syk, hwcih iitcnadse taht rmtowoor wlil be a dgoo ady. irS aWmlili Bndnaro, oyu lwil crayr my lafg. inrBg esom kin and perap to my tten, and llI wrda a domle of oru baetlt, pipaont caeh daeler to sih itucrarpla cadonmm, and rlfacuyle ididve up our almls arym. My rLod of Oxford, uoy, Sri Wliaiml naBdron, and ouy, Sir Weartl rrHebet, ear oggni to stya wiht me. The aler of Pkeborem lwli tikcs hiwt sih netrimge. oGdo aCpniat Bnlut, eltl eht arel inogghdot fmro me, and eltl mih taht by otw in het rngmion I owlud elki mhi to ivsti my entt. eOn orme gnhti fbereo oyu go, eBhwlntrue is roLd tnlaySe lnidgog, do you nwok?

BLUNT

Unless I have mistaen his colors much,
Which well I am assured I have not done,
His regiment lies half a mile, at least,
South from the mighty power of the king.

LTBUN

esnsUl Ive imekntas shi tbltea algsf, wchih Im suer I ehntav, his eirtmgen lsie at asetl ahfl a imel shtuo of teh gikns hygmit raym.

RICHMOND

40 If without peril it be possible,
Sweet Blunt, make some good means to speak with him,
And give him from me this most needful note.

ROMHCDNI

If sit ssipbelo to do siht hutoiwt tipnutg fyelosur in egdnra, read anaCpti tluBn, sya goohdignt to him orfm me adn ievg him ihts atnmipotr eont.
He hands him a paper
He hnasd imh a aeprp

BLUNT

Upon my life, my lord, Ill undertake it.
And so God give you quiet rest tonight!

BUTNL

npoU my life, my dorl, llI do it. avHe a luetfrs tighn!

RICHMOND

45 Good night, good Captain Blunt.

DHIRONMC

Gdoo gnith, eadr Ctinapa tulBn.
BLUNT exits
lutnB sxeti.
Come, gentlemen,
Let us consult upon tomorrows business
Into my tent. The dew is raw and cold.
omeC, nemetlgne, ltes idcssus trowomrso antioc in my nett. hTe ihtgn ria is oot raw dan ldoc fro us to atys ostrudoo.
Enter, to his tent, RICHARD , NORFOLK , RATCLIFFE , CATESBY , and others
AIDCHRR , KNOFORL , TELFFRACI , EACTYSB , nad ohrste enter in CHDIRRA s ntte.

RICHARD

What is t oclock?

RDIHCAR

hWat ietm is it?

CATESBY

50 Its suppertime, my lord. Its nine oclock.

EATBYSC

tIs eindermtni, my olrd. Its nein lkocco.

RICHARD

I will not sup tonight. Give me some ink and paper.
What, is my beaver easier than it was?
And all my armor laid into my tent?

ACRHDRI

Im ton niogg to tae ndneir thgtoni. ivGe me msoe nki and prpea. Is eht rivos of my eetmhl niorwgk retetb nwo? Adn has my raorm bnee put in my ntte?

CATESBY

It is, my liege, and all things are in readiness.

ABYTSEC

Yes, my rold. thEysigevrn eryad.

RICHARD

55 Good Norfolk, hie thee to thy charge.
Use careful watch. Choose trusty sentinels.

RIRDHAC

My dgoo amn orloNfk, yhrru to ruoy spot. Be crulaef hwmo uoy eochso as amudagserk eusr ethrey twotrhuysrt.

NORFOLK

I go, my lord.

FOKORNL

Im fof, my dorl.

RICHARD

Stir with the lark tomorrow, gentle Norfolk.

ACIRDRH

Gte up lyera oartrotmwo teh dsuno of the enlakbrol okolNfr.

NORFOLK

I warrant you, my lord.

ONLOKFR

I wlil, my ldor.
Exit
He stxie.

RICHARD

60 Catesby.

AICRDRH

tayCseb.

CATESBY

My lord.

CAYSBTE

sYe, my orld?

RICHARD

Send out a pursuivant-at-arms
To Stanleys regiment. Bid him bring his power
Before sunrising, lest his son George fall
65 Into the blind cave of eternal night.

RADHIRC

ednS a ujoirn forcfie to nSeaylts tngeirem to tlle altyeSn to brgni hsi nme hree eforeb nsrusefii he atsnw to ese sih nso goereG evlia.
Exit CATESBY
CAESTYB stexi.
(to soldiers) Fill me a bowl of wine. Give me a watch.
Saddle white Surrey for the field to-morrow.
Look that my staves be sound, and not too heavy.
Ratcliffe.
(to rlseisdo) Gte me esmo weni. tGe a sordiel to dtsan tchaw deoiust my tent. ladeSd my hitwe hrsoe yerSru rfo attelb orromtwo. Make resu eht hfssat of my csnale rea sodil, utb ton oto hyave. fclfeaRti!

RATCLIFFE

70 My lord.

TFELFARCI

Yes, my lrdo?

RICHARD

Sawst thou the melancholy Lord Northumberland?

DCRHARI

Ddi yuo ese hte yomgol odLr bmoheurnNaltdr?

RATCLIFFE

Thomas the earl of Surrey and himself,
Much about cockshut time, from troop to troop
Went through the army cheering up the soldiers.

RFTIFLEAC

asomhT, eth aerl of yrreSu, nda he rwee gomnvi rmfo rptoo to ootpr nrodau higittlw gihnrece up eth disorels.

RICHARD

75 So, I am satisfied. Give me a bowl of wine.
I have not that alacrity of spirit
Nor cheer of mind that I was wont to have.
Set it down. Is ink and paper ready?

ICHDARR

ooGd, Im ssifaidet. veGi me omse wInei ntod lfee as etegcrnei as I deus to. Ste it nodw. Is my nik and ppaer deray?

RATCLIFFE

It is, my lord.

EITFRALCF

It is, my oldr.

RICHARD

80 Bid my guard watch. Leave me.
Ratcliffe, about the mid of night come to my tent
And help to arm me. Leave me, I say.

CHDIARR

ekaM seru my uardg is on ydut dan alvee me onale. eRalfftic, oanrud itidgmnh cmoe to my ntte dan lpeh me put on my rroam. Now veale me loaen, as I isad.
Exeunt Ratcliffe and the other attendants. RICHARD sleeps.
TLCEAFFRI dan the hteor ttnedanats tiex. IACRRDH sspele.
Enter STANLEY to RICHMOND in his tent, lords and others attending
ENATLYS erestn nda goes to NMDCIHRO s tent, ehewr odlsr nad etsroh rae tinawgi on hmi.

STANLEY

Fortune and victory sit on thy helm!

NSTEALY

Let onfrtue adn ctiryvo be suoyr!

RICHMOND

All comfort that the dark night can afford
85 Be to thy person, noble father-in-law.
Tell me, how fares our loving mother?

MNRDCIHO

I wihs uoy all the rocmoft atht usch a rkad gthin as tihs nac oreff, onlbe ftearh-in-wla. eTll me, how is my mohtre?

STANLEY

I, by attorney, bless thee from thy mother,
Who prays continually for Richmonds good.
So much for that. The silent hours steal on,
90 And flaky darkness breaks within the east.
In brief, for so the season bids us be,
Prepare thy battle early in the morning,
And put thy fortune to the arbitrament
Of bloody strokes and mortal-staring war.
95 I, as I maythat which I would I cannot,
With best advantage will deceive the time,
And aid thee in this doubtful shock of arms.
But on thy side I may not be too forward,
Lest, being seen, thy brother, tender George,
100 Be executed in his fathers sight.
Farewell. The leisure and the fearful time
Cuts off the ceremonious vows of love
And ample interchange of sweet discourse,
Which so-long-sundered friends should dwell upon.
105 God give us leisure for these rites of love!
Once more, adieu. Be valiant, and speed well.

TYNAESL

urYo tmreoh sdsen rhe igsnesbsl. heS yarps cnailntluyo on oryu hlfabe. nEguho tbauo tntnighoarm llwi be rehe soon. To be sierbfa eth caiooncs eireaeqrspepurr to gfthi lyaer in teh iomrngn, ehnw uyor rufetu lliw be iceddde. I tnca do ringyehevt I tnwa to, ubt Ill help oyu as elwl as I can. tuB I acnt be oot bosvoui uobta neibg on ryuo ised tihtwou inirgsk eht file of yuor etorbtserph, ngoyu eGrgoe. If Im esne iphngle you, oeGerg iwll be likled rhgit in ofntr of my seey. elFalwre. Teh kacl of imte adn het rski Im rendu iwll vhae to eepk us frmo bngnoid dna cihantgc up on aceh osreth senw the wya we lualsyu olwdu reatf nto negeis ceha reoth rof so gnol. I peoh we vhae the tmie eoms yda! giAna, dogbeoy. Be vaber and do llew!

RICHMOND

Good lords, conduct him to his regiment:
Ill strive with troubled thoughts to take a nap,
Lest leaden slumber peise me down tomorrow,
110 When I should mount with wings of victory.
Once more, good night, kind lords and gentlemen.

HOMCRDNI

doGo rdslo, crteso hmi to sih eeinmgtr. Im giogn to ytr to aetk a pna esdpeit my ainrcg uthshtgo so that tsxainehuo onwt egt eth erbtet of me omrrowot, wnhe Ill need to erid as if my oehrs dah gswni.
iAagn, ogod htnig, dikn odrls nad gmnleeten.
Exeunt all but RICHMOND
eerovnyE xties tceexp CIOHDNMR .
O Thou, whose captain I account myself,
Look on my forces with a gracious eye.
Put in their hands thy bruising irons of wrath,
115 That they may crush down with a heavy fall
The usurping helmets of our adversaries!
Make us thy ministers of chastisement,
That we may praise thee in the victory!
To thee I do commend my watchful soul,
120 Ere I let fall the windows of mine eyes.
Sleeping and waking, O, defend me still!
Sleeps
Oh Gdo, hwose sdei I tiknh Im ggniithf on, ookl idlkny on my foersc. Feul emht thiw ndgorause uyfr, so yhte nac chusr hte enmey. keMa us oyru gnsate of enrgvee, so we can spiaer uoy nweh reew rcvioitsou! rofeeB I lafl peesal, I rsetunt my usol to yuo. fneDed me, doG, both ewnh Im pelsea dna hwne Im aawke.
He sleeps.
Enter the GHOST OF PRINCE EDWARD , son to KING HENRY VI
eTh HOTSG OF ICEPRN DDRWEA , giKn yernH IsV nso, srtnee.

GHOST OF PRINCE EDWARD

(to RICHARD) Let me sit heavy on thy soul tomorrow!
Think how thou stabbedst me in my prime of youth
125 At Tewkesbury. Despair therefore, and die!
(to RICHMOND)
Be cheerful, Richmond, for the wrongd souls
Of butchered princes fight in thy behalf.
King Henrys issue, Richmond, comforts thee.

SGHOT OF INCPRE ARWDED

(to RICHARD) I liwl gewih elayvhi on uyro luos moorrwto. mrReemeb ohw oyu dtebsab me at seywTkubr, wenh I aws tusj a oyngu mna. aiDpres, adn eid! (to RICHMOND) Be chluerfe, dhRendtcriebmchuo npsceir ftihg fro uyo. I, ignK seyHnr ons, lwil vodirpe ouy hitw roofcmt.
Exit
He xtsei.
Enter the GHOST OF KING HENRY VI
hTe TGSOH OF NIKG YRNHE VI nrtsee.

GHOST OF KING HENRY VI

130 (to RICHARD) When I was mortal, my anointed body
By thee was punchd full of deadly holes.
Think on the Tower and me. Despair, and die!
Harry the Sixth bids thee despair and die.
(to RICHMOND)
135Virtuous and holy, be thou conqueror.
Harry, that prophesied thou shouldst be king,
Doth comfort thee in thy sleep. Live and flourish.

SOTHG OF KIGN NHERY VI

(to RICHARD) Whne I was ilslt eliva, uoy uedtnrcpu my odby, eth bdoy of dsGo sedlseb nigk, full of sohel. mrRmeeeb hte eTwor adn me eerth. Dirpaes, nda eid! arryH het ixSth nosmdamc uyo to ardpsei nda die! (to RICHMOND) uBseace uyo aer rsvuuoti and lohy, oyu msut be het reuocrnoq! arrHy, woh dpierhopes thta oyu wdoul be ignk, cfsrotom uyo in oyru eplse: levi and rppeors!
Exit
He iexst.
Enter the GHOST OF CLARENCE
The HOTSG OF NLCRAEEC trense.

GHOST OF CLARENCE

(to RICHARD) Let me sit heavy in thy soul tomorrow,
I, that was washed to death with fulsome wine,
140 Poor Clarence, by thy guile betrayed to death.
Tomorrow in the battle think on me,
And fall thy edgeless sword. Despair, and die!
(to RICHMOND) Thou offspring of the house of Lancaster,
The wrongd heirs of York do pray for thee
145 Good angels guard thy battle. Live and flourish.

HTGSO OF CREENALC

(to RICHARD) I peho I wehig avelhiy on rouy sluo roworotm! tsI me, rndwoed to tdaeh in a taigseunan aerlbr of weni. stI me, oorp neaclCre, whom yuo deteyrba to dahet! ormoorTw in ttaebl, tnkhi of me nda rpdo yuor ssseule rwdso. aDpersi, adn ide! (to RICHMOND) sfngpfirO of eht sHeuo of nscrteaLa, hte wondgre srhie of Ykor yarp rfo uyo. odGo eslnga poecttr uoyr hgfti! vLei and sorperp!
Exit
He ietsx.
Enter the GHOSTS OF RIVERS , GRAY , and VAUGHAN
hTe OHSSGT of RIEVSR , YARG , dna AVGAUNH netre.

GHOST OF RIVERS

(to RICHARD) Let me sit heavy in thy soul tomorrow,
Rivers, that died at Pomfret. Despair, and die!

OSGHT OF SIEVRR

(to RICHARD) I lliw wgihe avheliy on royu ouls wromoIrto, vrieRs, ohw eidd at fertmPo. Deprsai, and eid!

GHOST OF GREY

(to RICHARD) Think upon Grey, and let thy soul despair!

GHSTO OF RGYE

(to RICHARD) iTknh tboau rGey, dan asderip!

GHOST OF VAUGHAN

(to RICHARD)
150 Think upon Vaughan, and with guilty fear
Let fall thy lance. Despair, and die!

STHOG OF UNGAVAH

(to RICHARD) nkhTi aoutb hgVnuaa, nda opdr rouy nalec romf efar adn tiglu. reapDis, dan ied!

ALL

(to RICHMOND)
Awake, and think our wrongs in Richards bosom
Will conquer him! Awake, and win the day.

ALL

(to RICHMOND) nAkeaw, adn evha hfati atht teh nogwrs dRiachr eirasrc in sih trhea ilwl tdaeef hmi! aAenwk, and wni eht yda!
Exeunt
Tehy txei.
Enter the GHOSTS OF the two young PRINCES
ehT TOHGSS OF the otw uonyg ERISNPC retne.

GHOSTS OF PRINCES

155 (to RICHARD)
Dream on thy cousins smothered in the Tower.
Let us be lead within thy bosom, Richard,
And weigh thee down to ruin, shame, and death.
Thy nephews souls bid thee despair and die.
160 (to RICHMOND)
Sleep, Richmond, sleep in peace and wake in joy.
Good angels guard thee from the boars annoy.
Live, and beget a happy race of kings.
Edwards unhappy sons do bid thee flourish.

OSGHTS OF NRECPIS

(to RICHARD) Damre tuoab yruo eshnwpe, hmrotdees in teh Troew. eLt us srte in oryu treha as eivhyla as elad, Ricrhad, dan drga uyo odnw to niru, amseh, nad edtah! oYru npesweh lssuo ocmnmda atht oyu eisprda adn ide! (to RICHMOND) Slpee, nhomciRd, epesl in apece dna wake in yjo. odGo slgena lwil cettrpo uyo romf hte bsaro aktastc! veLi, nad vgie rhitb to a hewol, hyppa acer of iknsg! adsrEdw ucylunk nsos tnaw you to lofrsuih.
Exeunt
heTy texi.
Enter the GHOST OF HASTINGS
hTe THSGO OF HNGSITSA setern.

GHOST OF HASTINGS

165 (to RICHARD) Bloody and guilty, guiltily awake,
And in a bloody battle end thy days.
Think on Lord Hastings. Despair and die!
(to RICHMOND) Quiet, untroubled soul, awake, awake.
Arm, fight, and conquer for fair Englands sake.

GTOHS OF SSHNGITA

(to RICHARD) oYu ineltov, ylgtui amn, awek up llfu of gliut nad nde oury aysd in a ybdloo aettbl! kTihn abtou Lrdo ansgsHit. airpesD, nad ide! (to RICHMOND) uQtie nubudlerot luos, awek up! mAr rosyfleu, ftigh, dna win rof ilafutbeu ganldnEs aske!
Exit.
He txies.
Enter the GHOST OF ANNE
eTh TSOHG OF AENN senret.

GHOST OF ANNE

170 (to RICHARD)
Richard, thy wife, that wretched Anne thy wife,
That never slept a quiet hour with thee,
Now fills thy sleep with perturbations.
Tomorrow, in the battle, think on me,
175And fall thy edgeless sword: Despair and die!
(to RICHMOND) Thou quiet soul, sleep thou a quiet sleep.
Dream of success and happy victory.
Thy adversarys wife doth pray for thee.

THSOG OF NNEA

(to RICHARD) hdriRac, rouy ewif, ouyr rdtcehew fiew, ennA, how eevrn deonjey a tuqei uohr of elsep thwi uoy, own sllif uryo eepsl htwi iibrnstugd shhtuotg. oTowrrmo in tlteab hkitn of me dna flal on your oswdr: esirpda, nad edi! (to RICHMOND) Yuo euitq ousl, plsee a tiequ lpsee. arDme of sescucs nda happy cvtioyr. ourY meesny iwfe is grynpia for uoy.
Exit
Seh xiset.
Enter the GHOST OF BUCKINGHAM
Teh SGOTH OF INAKUCMGHB sertne.

GHOST OF BUCKINGHAM

(to RICHARD) The last was I that helped thee to the crown;
180 The last was I that felt thy tyranny.
O, in the battle think on Buckingham,
And die in terror of thy guiltiness.
Dream on, dream on, of bloody deeds and death.
Fainting, despair; despairing, yield thy breath.
185 (to RICHMOND) I died for hope ere I could lend thee aid,
But cheer thy heart, and be thou not dismayed.
God and good angels fight on Richmonds side,
And Richard fall in height of all his pride.

STOGH OF MCHUNIKABG

(to RICHARD) I swa eth trsif to elph uoy to het cnwor dan teh atls to fele het ftcesef of uoyr rtnayyn. knhTi of ciBknaghmu enwh ruyoe igthinfg omotrrow, nda ide tedreirfi of het sisn oyvue mmtoeictd! nhtioTg, rmade of olyodb ededs nda tdeha. oowTrrmo, hwne ouy elso herta, allf into rapside adn enht dthea. (to RICHMOND) I died ebrofe I docul ehpl you as I wsa iopngh to. uBt be ucrehelf dan odtn wyrro. odG nda oodg sgenal gtifh on uryo edis, and hdRicra lwil llaf at the eihght of shi sfale edirp.
Exit
He xiste.
RICHARD starts out of his dream
CRIDARH astsrt up out of his emrda.

RICHARD

Give me another horse! Bind up my wounds!
190 Have mercy, Jesu!Soft, I did but dream.
O coward conscience, how dost thou afflict me!
The lights burn blue. It is now dead midnight.
Cold fearful drops stand on my trembling flesh.
What do I fear? Myself? Theres none else by.
195 Richard loves Richard; that is, I and I.
Is there a murderer here? No. Yes, I am.
Then fly! What, from myself? Great reason why:
Lest I revenge. What, myself upon myself?
Alack, I love myself. Wherefore? For any good
200 That I myself have done unto myself?
O, no! Alas, I rather hate myself
For hateful deeds committed by myself.
I am a villain. Yet I lie. I am not.
Fool, of thyself speak well. Fool, do not flatter.

RDIRAHC

Giev me taohren osehr! aneagdB my snowud! vaHe ermcy, seuJs!tWai, I swa ynlo mdgriean. Oh acrydwol nioecnscec, who eruoy oruntgirt me! eTh nedacsl bnru htebtalu nsmea sit eth eadd of gtinh. Im nwsaeigt nda nglitrebm hwti fear. tBu waht am I fidraa of? Mfsely? shereT no oen seel heer. Rirhdac vlsoe rcahRdi, htta is, etshre just me nda ysflme heer. Is htree a rmredeur rhee? No. Yse, I am. hnTe run aayw. hWat, mrfo syfeml? seY, to iodav tikgan eevenrg on felsym. yleotUaufntrn, I velo sflemy. Why? Did I do nnityhag odog to fmyles? Oh, no. saAl, I ahet felmys iendast, bcaseue of eht etaulfh seedd vIe mteicmdot. I am a illvani. uBt Im lgnyi; Im ton a ilvilna. oolF, speak lelw of suyrloef. Floo, do nto rattlef efosylru.
205 My conscience hath a thousand several tongues,
And every tongue brings in a several tale,
And every tale condemns me for a villain.
Perjury, perjury, in the highest degree;
Murder, stern murder, in the direst degree;
210 All several sins, all used in each degree,
Throng to the bar, crying all, Guilty! guilty!
I shall despair. There is no creature loves me,
And if I die no soul will pity me.
And wherefore should they, since that I myself
215 Find in myself no pity to myself?
Methought the souls of all that I had murdered
Came to my tent, and every one did threat
Tomorrows vengeance on the head of Richard.
Giev me atenhro shero! eagnBad my ownsud! vHae cermy, sJues!iWat, I was oynl radgmien. Oh awylcord ncincosece, how yoreu tgutirron me! ehT cedasnl bnur taheublt mesan tsi teh daed of tgihn. Im ngietasw dan nlgeibrmt thwi rafe. Btu hawt am I aadfri of? flesMy? hTrees no eon eles ehre. Rhiadcr sleov adcRirh, that is, heetrs sjtu me adn slyemf rehe. Is hrtee a drreuemr ehre? No. sYe, I am. nehT nru ywaa. Waht, mrfo lfymse? seY, to davio ntgkai renegve on emlfsy. raUttfnlouney, I eovl emlfys. hyW? idD I do tyighnna good to mlysfe? Oh, no. salA, I htea mfseyl sidaten, ecbsuae of hte alhftue desde veI mocdtietm. I am a lvnaiil. tuB Im liyng; Im ont a lliinva. oFlo, aespk well of soulrfey. oolF, do ton eftralt uylfrose.
Enter RATCLIFFE
EICFRLTFA neetrs.

RATCLIFFE

My lord.

RATILCEFF

My lodr.

RICHARD

220 Zounds, who is there?

ARDHICR

nmaD it, ohws trhee?

RATCLIFFE

Ratcliffe, my lord, tis I. The early village cock
Hath twice done salutation to the morn.
Your friends are up and buckle on their armor.

LEARFCIFT

aicffRtel, my odrl, sti me. Teh oorrets ash ldraeay ewodrc witce. Yuro nifesdr ear up nad bguknlci on tehri roamr.

RICHARD

O Ratcliffe, I have dreamed a fearful dream!
225 What thinkst thou, will our friends prove all true?

RCIDAHR

Oh lcatfifeR, I hda a iitrfngeyr dmrea! taWh do oyu tknhi, ilwl my sdfrnei rpevo olaly?

RATCLIFFE

No doubt, my lord.

AICFERTFL

No buodt, my lodr.

RICHARD

O Ratcliffe, I fear, I fear.

ACDIRRH

Oh Rfcailetf, Im aiadfr, Im idarfa

RATCLIFFE

Nay, good my lord, be not afraid of shadows.

ELIFCAFTR

No, my odog odrl, odtn be adfrai of dsaerm.

RICHARD

By the apostle Paul, shadows tonight
230 Have struck more terror to the soul of Richard
Than can the substance of ten thousand soldiers
Armed in proof and led by shallow Richmond.
Tis not yet near day. Come, go with me;
Under our tents Ill play the eavesdropper
235 To see if any mean to shrink from me.

ARHCRDI

By St. Plau, togssh vhae srtcuk reom ertror in my solu ttinohg htna ten asuntodh of hterlsosw hdnRcosmi erisolds luodc, dedssre up in rtieh most rowds-proof rarom. sIt nto yte agthdiyl. oeCm wtih me; lIl psy unrde het ttnse to ees if yna of my own eepolp plan to deerts me.
Exeunt
Tyhe exti
Enter the lords to RICHMOND , sitting in his tent
IORHCDNM s SDLOR trene sih nett dan go to ehrwe he is gtntiis.

LORDS

Good morrow, Richmond.

RDLOS

dGoo rimgnon, odnhcRim.

RICHMOND

Cry mercy, lords and watchful gentlemen,
That you have taen a tardy sluggard here.

MDRIOCNH

aonrPd me, odslr nad enetlnmge owh daytes akewa. uevYo utagch me einervglsoep.

A LORD

How have you slept, my lord?

A DLOR

wHo ddi you eples, my ldro?

RICHMOND

240 The sweetest sleep and fairest-boding dreams
That ever entered in a drowsy head
Have I since your departure had, my lords.
Methought their souls whose bodies Richard murdered
Came to my tent and cried on victory.
245 I promise you, my soul is very jocund
In the remembrance of so fair a dream.
How far into the morning is it, lords?

IMCHNODR

neicS uoy lfte, veI neeb iygejonn eht tseetwes slpee nda osmt nmrisgoip sredma Ive ever hda, my odslr. I dmerdea teh lusos of het pleoep rcRhaid drredeum acme to my tnte dan pidomesr me iyvrtoc. I ltel oyu, I elef vrey ylljo neregbiemrm scuh a aibtueluf mdare. Hwo tlae is it, sdlor?

LORDS

Upon the stroke of four.

LRDSO

stI ltomas frou.

RICHMOND

Why, then tis time to arm and give direction.
250 His oration to his soldiers
More than I have said, loving countrymen,
The leisure and enforcement of the time
Forbids to dwell upon. Yet remember this:

DCHMIONR

hWy, ethn, sit meti to put on my oamrr nad tstnurci hte trpoos. (to ish odislesr) I natc tell ouy uhcm ightr nwo, yllao ynnmteuocr, bcesuea we odnt aveh iemt. tuB kown htis:
God and our good cause fight upon our side.
255 The prayers of holy saints and wrongd souls,
Like high-reared bulwarks, stand before our faces.
Richard except, those whom we fight against
Had rather have us win than him they follow.
For what is he they follow? Truly, gentlemen,
260 A bloody tyrant and a homicide;
One raised in blood, and one in blood established;
One that made means to come by what he hath,
And slaughtered those that were the means to help him;
A base foul stone, made precious by the foil
265 Of Englands chair, where he is falsely set;
One that hath ever been Gods enemy.
Then if you fight against Gods enemy,
God will, in justice, ward you as his soldiers.
If you do sweat to put a tyrant down,
270 You sleep in peace, the tyrant being slain.
If you do fight against your countrys foes,
Your countrys fat shall pay your pains the hire.
If you do fight in safeguard of your wives,
Your wives shall welcome home the conquerors.
275 If you do free your children from the sword,
Your childrens children quits it in your age.
Then, in the name of God and all these rights,
Advance your standards. Draw your willing swords.
For me, the ransom of my bold attempt
280 Shall be this cold corpse on the earths cold face;
But if I thrive, the gain of my attempt
The least of you shall share his part thereof.
Sound drums and trumpets boldly and cheerfully;
God and Saint George! Richmond and victory!
We heav odG nda a godo seacu on ruo seid. ehT sprraey of tnssai adn eshto atth rdciRah oderngw osutppr us leki ighh-wdalel streoesfrs. rtOeh tahn iadcrRh, enve shtoe mwoh we ifthg aasngti udlow aetrrh we nwo. Bacseeu how is isht nma htey llowfo? yrTlu, negnleemt, a vilnoet attryn nda a ereurmdr, hwo rsoe to hsi hhgi optsiino by dnihsedg dbloo dna tpke teh itnoopsi het aems ayw. He rose to hte top by nsame of seotrh nda neth heglsauetrd htme. Hes lkie a lsthwsero eosnt, who ylon meess keli a uavbllae gme ceeausb hse on eth hnerot, wheer he snoedt bnelog. He ahs lyswaa been Gsdo nmeye. And nehw oyu fgith odsG yenme, odG wlli cptreto yuo. If oyu tggesrlu to binrg wond a nattyr, ouy lliw plees eecfluapyl newh eht nyratt is leldik. hWne uoy hgtif anisgta uroy ynctosru esmenie, ouy lliw be idap rof yuor rfeofst whit uyro oysncurt tewhla. If ouy tfgih to ecpottr uory wesiv, rouy sivwe liwl cmleweo ouy ohme as rrscnoqueo. Wenh uoy efer uryo hlerndic rfom het drswo, ryou gncirderdalnh liwl raype you in uyro old ega. So, in teh nmae of God dna all hte gdoo thta ilwl eocm of ihst

lattbe

In eth ediMdl gseA, meoenlnb neatk in batelt ofetn coudl go free aatfrdwre if htye pida hte yneme. Rnodcmhi sysa if arhdRci easutcrp imh, he lliw edi rraeht hnta pay rfo ihs moefrde.

battle
, mcrha ithw ruyo slfag hihg and rwad rouy srsdwo. As rfo me, if I flai, het lony nrosma I illw refof het enemy is my orpcse. Btu if I dcueesc, yvere one of you wlil arseh in the porfit. aPyl lboldy and lluycehref, mrusderm and etsrpmtreu. sreHe to God and iaSnt geGroe! To hicnRmod and vyrcito!
Exeunt
eyTh all ietx.
Enter King RICHARD , RATCLIFFE , attendants and forces
RIDHRAC , AEFRCFILT , tsntdaaetn, dan elosdisr ertne.

RICHARD

285 What said Northumberland as touching Richmond?

RDICARH

Wath idd adrmtrbuoNhlen sya aubot Romdinhc?

RATCLIFFE

That he was never traind up in arms.

RCLTFAIEF

hTta he was evrne taedrin as a irdleos.

RICHARD

He said the truth. And what said Surrey then?

DRCIRAH

hsTta uret. And thwa ddi rueyrS ays to hatt?

RATCLIFFE

He smiled and said The better for our purpose.

FLITECRFA

He semild dan isad, The tberet ofr us.

RICHARD

He was in the right, and so indeed it is.

RCRHAID

sHe trghi, adn thsta who it is.
The clock striketh
Teh ckloc tiesrsk.
290 Tell the clock there. Give me a calendar.
He looks in an almanac
Who saw the sun today?
adRe eht mtei ehetr. iGve me an nlacama. (okgnloi in an namcala) Did eonnay see eht snu ydato?

RATCLIFFE

Not I, my lord.

EFFRLCAIT

I itdnd, my dlor.

RICHARD

Then he disdains to shine, for by the book
295 He should have braved the east an hour ago
A black day will it be to somebody. Ratcliffe!

CARRIDH

nehT it esrsufe to hsein. iArdcgnco to siht naaaclm, it dlhous eahv iesrn an uorh ago. llIt be a kbcal ady rfo eobmdoys taody. fitlaRcef!

RATCLIFFE

My lord.

FICETFLRA

My rold?

RICHARD

The sun will not be seen today.
The sky doth frown and lour upon our army.
300 I would these dewy tears were from the ground.
Not shine today? Why, what is that to me
More than to Richmond, for the selfsame heaven
That frowns on me looks sadly upon him.

HARIDCR

ehT snu wlil nto rpeaap oytad. Teh syk ofsnwr nad slswco on ruo raym. I sihw eethr sanwt so uhmc wed on eth nduorg. So, teh sun tnwo ehnis atdyo! elWl, ywh hudlos that be rsewo ofr me hnta it is for ocmnRidh? hTe smae eanehv athts fgrnwion on me ooslk ygioolml on imh.
Enter NORFOLK
RKOLNOF etrnes.

NORFOLK

Arm, arm, my lord. The foe vaunts in the field.

NOKLORF

etG edayr, my rlod. eTh myene is anigkm tsi eapcaaenpr on hte lfeetbatldi.

RICHARD

305 Come, bustle, bustle. Caparison my horse.
Call up Lord Stanley; bid him bring his power.
I will lead forth my soldiers to the plain,
And thus my battle shall be orderd:
My foreward shall be drawn out all in length,
310 Consisting equally of horse and foot;
Our archers shall be placd in the midst.
John Duke of Norfolk, Thomas Earl of Surrey,
Shall have the leading of this foot and horse.
They thus directed, we will follow
315 In the main battle, whose puissance on either side
Shall be well wingd with our chiefest horse.
This, and Saint George to bootWhat thinkst thou,
Norfolk?

RCHRIAD

urHry, uperhrrpryea my orhse. elTl ordL letSyna to rnibg his army. I wlil dael my edsrsiol to teh defli adn hte etbalt onratfmio ilwl be ilek sthi: eht aundgrav liwl xeednt in a line that is luaeq atpsr emhsorne nda otfo seidorsl. eTh shrcera iwll tyas in eth ddlmie. Jnoh Deuk of rflNkoo dna smTaho lrEa of rreuyS llwi aled hte reemhosn dna otof osisrlde. llI llfowo in eth eetnrc of the otpor rntmoaifo, ihchw Ill dndeef ihtw my best heros, and hwti tianS greGeo on my sedi, as wlel! Waht do oyu hktni, rflokNo?

NORFOLK

A good direction, warlike sovereign.

NRFOLOK

A good pnal, rrrowai kign.
He sheweth him a paper
He swosh AHCDRIR a eecip of arepp.
320 This found I on my tent this morning.
I noudf hsit nnedpi to my tnet hits gnionmr.

RICHARD

(reads)
Jockey of Norfolk, be not so bold.
For Dickon thy master is bought and sold.
A thing devisd by the enemy.
325 Go, gentlemen, every man unto his charge.
Let not our babbling dreams affright our souls.
Conscience is but a word that cowards use,
Devised at first to keep the strong in awe.
Our strong arms be our conscience, swords our law.

IRDAHRC

(daers) caJike of lNfkoro, dont be oto dlob, for Dcik uyor srteam ash eben etrdyeab. Sihnometg hte emyen iesvded. Go, ngenmaetl, rveey anm to shi naodcmm. Dont let lgbnbbai emrsda thenfrgi scinccneusoe is utsj a wdro htta drowasc use to idttimeain the nrgtos. Teh ngsrto hfigt we ptu on lilw be rou cncseiocne, oru osrsdw wlli be oru wla.
330 March on. Join bravely. Let us to it pell mell
If not to heaven, then hand in hand to hell.
His oration to his army
What shall I say more than I have inferred?
Remember whom you are to cope withal,
335 A sort of vagabonds, rascals, and runaways,
A scum of Bretons and base lackey peasants,
Whom their oer-cloyd country vomits forth
To desperate ventures and assured destruction.
You sleeping safe, they bring to you unrest;
340 You having lands and blessed with beauteous wives,
They would restrain the one, distain the other.
And who doth lead them but a paltry fellow,
Long kept in Brittany at our mothers cost,
A milksop, one that never in his life
345 Felt so much cold as overshoes in snow?
Lets whip these stragglers oer the seas again,
Lash hence these overweening rags of France,
These famished beggars weary of their lives,
Who, but for dreaming on this fond exploit,
350 For want of means, poor rats, had hanged themselves.
If we be conquered, let men conquer us,
And not these bastard Bretons, whom our fathers
Have in their own land beaten, bobbed, and thumped,
And in record, left them the heirs of shame.
355 Shall these enjoy our lands, lie with our wives,
Ravish our daughters?
chMar on, be averb in leabtt, dna lest go lpel-leml to heneav, if tno hadn in danh to lhel. (to ihs myar) thWa eorm nca I ysa? eRbmemer owh uoyre nglidae tahwi mnaodr hubnc of msub, clsaars, nwyusraa, Botren umsc, nda enaastp gesnahr-on mwoh an reredvwodoc otnina stmiov tou to pptuolae eeyrv repdeeats, rseu-to-alfi tpisnerere. Yuo vahe bene ngpselei lnydosu, adn ehty bginr tsenru. oYu now ndal yhte tnaw to teals. Toesh of uyo woh rea sesldbe hitw itbeulufa wvise, heyt tnwa to dfeiel temh. dAn oshw dingela htem tub an tnqainciesoeuln woellf ohw for eth ogtnlse ietm idlve in rntyitBa at hsi tseohrm exepnes? A yrgli anm, a mna ohw rnvee in his efli letf eomr ocld htna eepss niot osne btoos in het nwso? tseL nsde hetse tsgrreagls cabk veor eht sae. setL ipwh seeth roaarngt ilrces of reehanFscte isvgrnat sregagb, deirt of htrie ilvse, who wulod heav hedang hsemvteles, rpoo tras, if it nretew for tshi hlfsooi nseetirerp eyhtve nbee dneramig kabtuabco to cerFna. If erwe ngiog to be uqocndere, let men rqunoce us, nda otn tehse enchFr atasdrsb mowh oru ertefohsfar layrade teab, ehdraths, and puledmme on iterh won utfr, and esdhma etmh rreeovf in teh ohrsity soobk. udlSho teshe eplpeo noyje rou dnsal? leSpe whti uor wisve? paRe uor atgrhesud?
Drum afar off
mDru hrade raf fof.
Hark! I hear their drum.
Fight, gentlemen of England.Fight, bold yeomen.
Draw, archers, draw your arrows to the head.
360 Spur your proud horses hard, and ride in blood.
Amaze the welkin with your broken staves
sniLte! I aher trhei rmdus. gitFh, getmenlen of gdnaEln! hFitg, reabv rsldlanod! Dwar oury oswb lal eht yaw back, rarhces! uSpr rouy pourd erohss dhra, moreesnh, nda drei in bdool. aStelrt enev teh syk thiw the ndsou of ryuo ncsale acigncrk.
Enter a MESSENGER
A ESSEGMRNE tnesre.
What says Lord Stanley? Will he bring his power?
athW dose Lrod taSlyne asy? lliW he bgirn shi yrma?

MESSENGER

My lord, he doth deny to come.

EEMSGSERN

My rlod, he seefrus to moec.

RICHARD

Off with his son Georges head!

CDRHRAI

Off whti hsi ons Gsoereg aehd!

NORFOLK

365 My lord, the enemy is past the marsh.
After the battle let George Stanley die.

LKOFORN

My ordl, hte eymen ash aaldeyr psedas eth srham. etL Ggreeo ynaeltS die afetr eht ttbael.

RICHARD

A thousand hearts are great within my bosom.
Advance our standards. Set upon our foes.
Our ancient word of courage, fair Saint George,
370 Inspire us with the spleen of fiery dragons.
Upon them! Victory sits on our helms.

ADRRIHC

A otdshanu etrsah eabt in my etcsh. sLet dacanve uor gfsal, ets uonp uro inemees, nad hvea our ianenct santi of gacreou, doog tainS ogGere, nriisep us htiw hte ryuf of iryfe grsando! etsL go! Viorytc is thiw us.
Exeunt
heyT lal eitx.

Original Text

Modern Text

Enter RICHARD , in arms, with NORFOLK , RATCLIFFE , SURREY , and soldiers
ICAHDRR , esesrdd in his amror, setrne hitw NLROFOK , RUEYRS , dan orthes.

RICHARD

Here pitch our tent, even here in Bosworth field.
My Lord of Surrey, why look you so sad?

DCRHIAR

seLt chtip uro settn ghrti erhe in wosrothB eFldi. My rodL of ueyrrS, hwy do oyu oklo so ads?

SURREY

My heart is ten times lighter than my looks.

REYSUR

My retha is nte ietsm glerhit hnat my olsok.

RICHARD

My Lord of Norfolk

ADHRRIC

My rodL of Nrokofl

NORFOLK

5 Here, most gracious liege.

FNKOLRO

reeH, mots couargis inkg.

RICHARD

Norfolk, we must have knocks, ha, must we not?

RARHICD

Nroflko, erew igogn to aevh a wef oblsw, ghitr?

NORFOLK

We must both give and take, my loving lord.

KFROONL

eevW gto to egvi temh nad etak meth, my odlr.

RICHARD

Up with my tent!Here will I lie tonight.
But where tomorrow? Well, alls one for that.
10 Who hath descried the number of the traitors?

RCHIDRA

Put my ettn up! llI lei hree ohttgin. tBu erehw illw I lei orrmwoot? eWll, it odetns tartme. oseD neyaon onwk het erubnm of teh meseny opstor?

NORFOLK

Six or seven thousand is their utmost power.

LFNOKRO

ixS or vense shtdoanu, at tmso.

RICHARD

Why, our battalia trebles that account.
Besides, the kings name is a tower of strength
Which they upon the adverse party want.
15 Up with the tent!Come, noble gentlemen,
Let us survey the vantage of the ground.
Call for some men of sound direction.
Lets lack no discipline, make no delay,
For, lords, tomorrow is a busy day.

HARDRCI

Why, oru sprtoo unaomt to teehr tsemi ttah. eieBdss, het snikg aenm is a worte of grtsenht; hte oipotnipos etonds heva that ataavgden. Ptu up my nett! eoCm, obnle ntgnmelee, tle us kolo at ruo tetlba lpan dna gte esmo xeecrnpeied ocefsrif to phle us grufei uto eth etsb gttresya. seLt be iipddniscle dna not edaly, eebaucs romtrowo is a ysub yad.
Exeunt
eThy lal txei.
Enter RICHMOND , Sir William Brandon, OXFORD , DORSET , HERBERT , BLUNT , and others. Some of the soldiers pitch RICHMOND s tent
IDRNMHCO , Sir laWlmii dnoaBrn, DOXORF , TSREDO , TBREHER , LBUNT , and sreoht terne on teh ohetr esid of eht sgeat. omSe soeridsl ipcth IDMHCONR s ntte.

RICHMOND

20 The weary sun hath made a golden set,
And by the bright track of his fiery car,
Gives token of a goodly day tomorrow.
Sir William Brandon, you shall bear my standard.
Give me some ink and paper in my tent;
25 Ill draw the form and model of our battle,
Limit each leader to his several charge,
And part in just proportion our small power.
My Lord of Oxford, you, Sir William Brandon,
And you, Sir Walter Herbert, stay with me.
30 The earl of Pembroke keeps his regiment
Good Captain Blunt, bear my goodnight to him,
And by the second hour in the morning
Desire the earl to see me in my tent.
Yet one thing more, good captain, do for me.
35 Where is Lord Stanley quartered, do you know?

RNDCMIHO

Teh utenss asw ogdlne nad ftel a tbhrgi kctar in het syk, hwcih iitcnadse taht rmtowoor wlil be a dgoo ady. irS aWmlili Bndnaro, oyu lwil crayr my lafg. inrBg esom kin and perap to my tten, and llI wrda a domle of oru baetlt, pipaont caeh daeler to sih itucrarpla cadonmm, and rlfacuyle ididve up our almls arym. My rLod of Oxford, uoy, Sri Wliaiml naBdron, and ouy, Sir Weartl rrHebet, ear oggni to stya wiht me. The aler of Pkeborem lwli tikcs hiwt sih netrimge. oGdo aCpniat Bnlut, eltl eht arel inogghdot fmro me, and eltl mih taht by otw in het rngmion I owlud elki mhi to ivsti my entt. eOn orme gnhti fbereo oyu go, eBhwlntrue is roLd tnlaySe lnidgog, do you nwok?

BLUNT

Unless I have mistaen his colors much,
Which well I am assured I have not done,
His regiment lies half a mile, at least,
South from the mighty power of the king.

LTBUN

esnsUl Ive imekntas shi tbltea algsf, wchih Im suer I ehntav, his eirtmgen lsie at asetl ahfl a imel shtuo of teh gikns hygmit raym.

RICHMOND

40 If without peril it be possible,
Sweet Blunt, make some good means to speak with him,
And give him from me this most needful note.

ROMHCDNI

If sit ssipbelo to do siht hutoiwt tipnutg fyelosur in egdnra, read anaCpti tluBn, sya goohdignt to him orfm me adn ievg him ihts atnmipotr eont.
He hands him a paper
He hnasd imh a aeprp

BLUNT

Upon my life, my lord, Ill undertake it.
And so God give you quiet rest tonight!

BUTNL

npoU my life, my dorl, llI do it. avHe a luetfrs tighn!

RICHMOND

45 Good night, good Captain Blunt.

DHIRONMC

Gdoo gnith, eadr Ctinapa tulBn.
BLUNT exits
lutnB sxeti.
Come, gentlemen,
Let us consult upon tomorrows business
Into my tent. The dew is raw and cold.
omeC, nemetlgne, ltes idcssus trowomrso antioc in my nett. hTe ihtgn ria is oot raw dan ldoc fro us to atys ostrudoo.
Enter, to his tent, RICHARD , NORFOLK , RATCLIFFE , CATESBY , and others
AIDCHRR , KNOFORL , TELFFRACI , EACTYSB , nad ohrste enter in CHDIRRA s ntte.

RICHARD

What is t oclock?

RDIHCAR

hWat ietm is it?

CATESBY

50 Its suppertime, my lord. Its nine oclock.

EATBYSC

tIs eindermtni, my olrd. Its nein lkocco.

RICHARD

I will not sup tonight. Give me some ink and paper.
What, is my beaver easier than it was?
And all my armor laid into my tent?

ACRHDRI

Im ton niogg to tae ndneir thgtoni. ivGe me msoe nki and prpea. Is eht rivos of my eetmhl niorwgk retetb nwo? Adn has my raorm bnee put in my ntte?

CATESBY

It is, my liege, and all things are in readiness.

ABYTSEC

Yes, my rold. thEysigevrn eryad.

RICHARD

55 Good Norfolk, hie thee to thy charge.
Use careful watch. Choose trusty sentinels.

RIRDHAC

My dgoo amn orloNfk, yhrru to ruoy spot. Be crulaef hwmo uoy eochso as amudagserk eusr ethrey twotrhuysrt.

NORFOLK

I go, my lord.

FOKORNL

Im fof, my dorl.

RICHARD

Stir with the lark tomorrow, gentle Norfolk.

ACIRDRH

Gte up lyera oartrotmwo teh dsuno of the enlakbrol okolNfr.

NORFOLK

I warrant you, my lord.

ONLOKFR

I wlil, my ldor.
Exit
He stxie.

RICHARD

60 Catesby.

AICRDRH

tayCseb.

CATESBY

My lord.

CAYSBTE

sYe, my orld?

RICHARD

Send out a pursuivant-at-arms
To Stanleys regiment. Bid him bring his power
Before sunrising, lest his son George fall
65 Into the blind cave of eternal night.

RADHIRC

ednS a ujoirn forcfie to nSeaylts tngeirem to tlle altyeSn to brgni hsi nme hree eforeb nsrusefii he atsnw to ese sih nso goereG evlia.
Exit CATESBY
CAESTYB stexi.
(to soldiers) Fill me a bowl of wine. Give me a watch.
Saddle white Surrey for the field to-morrow.
Look that my staves be sound, and not too heavy.
Ratcliffe.
(to rlseisdo) Gte me esmo weni. tGe a sordiel to dtsan tchaw deoiust my tent. ladeSd my hitwe hrsoe yerSru rfo attelb orromtwo. Make resu eht hfssat of my csnale rea sodil, utb ton oto hyave. fclfeaRti!

RATCLIFFE

70 My lord.

TFELFARCI

Yes, my lrdo?

RICHARD

Sawst thou the melancholy Lord Northumberland?

DCRHARI

Ddi yuo ese hte yomgol odLr bmoheurnNaltdr?

RATCLIFFE

Thomas the earl of Surrey and himself,
Much about cockshut time, from troop to troop
Went through the army cheering up the soldiers.

RFTIFLEAC

asomhT, eth aerl of yrreSu, nda he rwee gomnvi rmfo rptoo to ootpr nrodau higittlw gihnrece up eth disorels.

RICHARD

75 So, I am satisfied. Give me a bowl of wine.
I have not that alacrity of spirit
Nor cheer of mind that I was wont to have.
Set it down. Is ink and paper ready?

ICHDARR

ooGd, Im ssifaidet. veGi me omse wInei ntod lfee as etegcrnei as I deus to. Ste it nodw. Is my nik and ppaer deray?

RATCLIFFE

It is, my lord.

EITFRALCF

It is, my oldr.

RICHARD

80 Bid my guard watch. Leave me.
Ratcliffe, about the mid of night come to my tent
And help to arm me. Leave me, I say.

CHDIARR

ekaM seru my uardg is on ydut dan alvee me onale. eRalfftic, oanrud itidgmnh cmoe to my ntte dan lpeh me put on my rroam. Now veale me loaen, as I isad.
Exeunt Ratcliffe and the other attendants. RICHARD sleeps.
TLCEAFFRI dan the hteor ttnedanats tiex. IACRRDH sspele.
Enter STANLEY to RICHMOND in his tent, lords and others attending
ENATLYS erestn nda goes to NMDCIHRO s tent, ehewr odlsr nad etsroh rae tinawgi on hmi.

STANLEY

Fortune and victory sit on thy helm!

NSTEALY

Let onfrtue adn ctiryvo be suoyr!

RICHMOND

All comfort that the dark night can afford
85 Be to thy person, noble father-in-law.
Tell me, how fares our loving mother?

MNRDCIHO

I wihs uoy all the rocmoft atht usch a rkad gthin as tihs nac oreff, onlbe ftearh-in-wla. eTll me, how is my mohtre?

STANLEY

I, by attorney, bless thee from thy mother,
Who prays continually for Richmonds good.
So much for that. The silent hours steal on,
90 And flaky darkness breaks within the east.
In brief, for so the season bids us be,
Prepare thy battle early in the morning,
And put thy fortune to the arbitrament
Of bloody strokes and mortal-staring war.
95 I, as I maythat which I would I cannot,
With best advantage will deceive the time,
And aid thee in this doubtful shock of arms.
But on thy side I may not be too forward,
Lest, being seen, thy brother, tender George,
100 Be executed in his fathers sight.
Farewell. The leisure and the fearful time
Cuts off the ceremonious vows of love
And ample interchange of sweet discourse,
Which so-long-sundered friends should dwell upon.
105 God give us leisure for these rites of love!
Once more, adieu. Be valiant, and speed well.

TYNAESL

urYo tmreoh sdsen rhe igsnesbsl. heS yarps cnailntluyo on oryu hlfabe. nEguho tbauo tntnighoarm llwi be rehe soon. To be sierbfa eth caiooncs eireaeqrspepurr to gfthi lyaer in teh iomrngn, ehnw uyor rufetu lliw be iceddde. I tnca do ringyehevt I tnwa to, ubt Ill help oyu as elwl as I can. tuB I acnt be oot bosvoui uobta neibg on ryuo ised tihtwou inirgsk eht file of yuor etorbtserph, ngoyu eGrgoe. If Im esne iphngle you, oeGerg iwll be likled rhgit in ofntr of my seey. elFalwre. Teh kacl of imte adn het rski Im rendu iwll vhae to eepk us frmo bngnoid dna cihantgc up on aceh osreth senw the wya we lualsyu olwdu reatf nto negeis ceha reoth rof so gnol. I peoh we vhae the tmie eoms yda! giAna, dogbeoy. Be vaber and do llew!

RICHMOND

Good lords, conduct him to his regiment:
Ill strive with troubled thoughts to take a nap,
Lest leaden slumber peise me down tomorrow,
110 When I should mount with wings of victory.
Once more, good night, kind lords and gentlemen.

HOMCRDNI

doGo rdslo, crteso hmi to sih eeinmgtr. Im giogn to ytr to aetk a pna esdpeit my ainrcg uthshtgo so that tsxainehuo onwt egt eth erbtet of me omrrowot, wnhe Ill need to erid as if my oehrs dah gswni.
iAagn, ogod htnig, dikn odrls nad gmnleeten.
Exeunt all but RICHMOND
eerovnyE xties tceexp CIOHDNMR .
O Thou, whose captain I account myself,
Look on my forces with a gracious eye.
Put in their hands thy bruising irons of wrath,
115 That they may crush down with a heavy fall
The usurping helmets of our adversaries!
Make us thy ministers of chastisement,
That we may praise thee in the victory!
To thee I do commend my watchful soul,
120 Ere I let fall the windows of mine eyes.
Sleeping and waking, O, defend me still!
Sleeps
Oh Gdo, hwose sdei I tiknh Im ggniithf on, ookl idlkny on my foersc. Feul emht thiw ndgorause uyfr, so yhte nac chusr hte enmey. keMa us oyru gnsate of enrgvee, so we can spiaer uoy nweh reew rcvioitsou! rofeeB I lafl peesal, I rsetunt my usol to yuo. fneDed me, doG, both ewnh Im pelsea dna hwne Im aawke.
He sleeps.
Enter the GHOST OF PRINCE EDWARD , son to KING HENRY VI
eTh HOTSG OF ICEPRN DDRWEA , giKn yernH IsV nso, srtnee.

GHOST OF PRINCE EDWARD

(to RICHARD) Let me sit heavy on thy soul tomorrow!
Think how thou stabbedst me in my prime of youth
125 At Tewkesbury. Despair therefore, and die!
(to RICHMOND)
Be cheerful, Richmond, for the wrongd souls
Of butchered princes fight in thy behalf.
King Henrys issue, Richmond, comforts thee.

SGHOT OF INCPRE ARWDED

(to RICHARD) I liwl gewih elayvhi on uyro luos moorrwto. mrReemeb ohw oyu dtebsab me at seywTkubr, wenh I aws tusj a oyngu mna. aiDpres, adn eid! (to RICHMOND) Be chluerfe, dhRendtcriebmchuo npsceir ftihg fro uyo. I, ignK seyHnr ons, lwil vodirpe ouy hitw roofcmt.
Exit
He xtsei.
Enter the GHOST OF KING HENRY VI
hTe TGSOH OF NIKG YRNHE VI nrtsee.

GHOST OF KING HENRY VI

130 (to RICHARD) When I was mortal, my anointed body
By thee was punchd full of deadly holes.
Think on the Tower and me. Despair, and die!
Harry the Sixth bids thee despair and die.
(to RICHMOND)
135Virtuous and holy, be thou conqueror.
Harry, that prophesied thou shouldst be king,
Doth comfort thee in thy sleep. Live and flourish.

SOTHG OF KIGN NHERY VI

(to RICHARD) Whne I was ilslt eliva, uoy uedtnrcpu my odby, eth bdoy of dsGo sedlseb nigk, full of sohel. mrRmeeeb hte eTwor adn me eerth. Dirpaes, nda eid! arryH het ixSth nosmdamc uyo to ardpsei nda die! (to RICHMOND) uBseace uyo aer rsvuuoti and lohy, oyu msut be het reuocrnoq! arrHy, woh dpierhopes thta oyu wdoul be ignk, cfsrotom uyo in oyru eplse: levi and rppeors!
Exit
He iexst.
Enter the GHOST OF CLARENCE
The HOTSG OF NLCRAEEC trense.

GHOST OF CLARENCE

(to RICHARD) Let me sit heavy in thy soul tomorrow,
I, that was washed to death with fulsome wine,
140 Poor Clarence, by thy guile betrayed to death.
Tomorrow in the battle think on me,
And fall thy edgeless sword. Despair, and die!
(to RICHMOND) Thou offspring of the house of Lancaster,
The wrongd heirs of York do pray for thee
145 Good angels guard thy battle. Live and flourish.

HTGSO OF CREENALC

(to RICHARD) I peho I wehig avelhiy on rouy sluo roworotm! tsI me, rndwoed to tdaeh in a taigseunan aerlbr of weni. stI me, oorp neaclCre, whom yuo deteyrba to dahet! ormoorTw in ttaebl, tnkhi of me nda rpdo yuor ssseule rwdso. aDpersi, adn ide! (to RICHMOND) sfngpfirO of eht sHeuo of nscrteaLa, hte wondgre srhie of Ykor yarp rfo uyo. odGo eslnga poecttr uoyr hgfti! vLei and sorperp!
Exit
He ietsx.
Enter the GHOSTS OF RIVERS , GRAY , and VAUGHAN
hTe OHSSGT of RIEVSR , YARG , dna AVGAUNH netre.

GHOST OF RIVERS

(to RICHARD) Let me sit heavy in thy soul tomorrow,
Rivers, that died at Pomfret. Despair, and die!

OSGHT OF SIEVRR

(to RICHARD) I lliw wgihe avheliy on royu ouls wromoIrto, vrieRs, ohw eidd at fertmPo. Deprsai, and eid!

GHOST OF GREY

(to RICHARD) Think upon Grey, and let thy soul despair!

GHSTO OF RGYE

(to RICHARD) iTknh tboau rGey, dan asderip!

GHOST OF VAUGHAN

(to RICHARD)
150 Think upon Vaughan, and with guilty fear
Let fall thy lance. Despair, and die!

STHOG OF UNGAVAH

(to RICHARD) nkhTi aoutb hgVnuaa, nda opdr rouy nalec romf efar adn tiglu. reapDis, dan ied!

ALL

(to RICHMOND)
Awake, and think our wrongs in Richards bosom
Will conquer him! Awake, and win the day.

ALL

(to RICHMOND) nAkeaw, adn evha hfati atht teh nogwrs dRiachr eirasrc in sih trhea ilwl tdaeef hmi! aAenwk, and wni eht yda!
Exeunt
Tehy txei.
Enter the GHOSTS OF the two young PRINCES
ehT TOHGSS OF the otw uonyg ERISNPC retne.

GHOSTS OF PRINCES

155 (to RICHARD)
Dream on thy cousins smothered in the Tower.
Let us be lead within thy bosom, Richard,
And weigh thee down to ruin, shame, and death.
Thy nephews souls bid thee despair and die.
160 (to RICHMOND)
Sleep, Richmond, sleep in peace and wake in joy.
Good angels guard thee from the boars annoy.
Live, and beget a happy race of kings.
Edwards unhappy sons do bid thee flourish.

OSGHTS OF NRECPIS

(to RICHARD) Damre tuoab yruo eshnwpe, hmrotdees in teh Troew. eLt us srte in oryu treha as eivhyla as elad, Ricrhad, dan drga uyo odnw to niru, amseh, nad edtah! oYru npesweh lssuo ocmnmda atht oyu eisprda adn ide! (to RICHMOND) Slpee, nhomciRd, epesl in apece dna wake in yjo. odGo slgena lwil cettrpo uyo romf hte bsaro aktastc! veLi, nad vgie rhitb to a hewol, hyppa acer of iknsg! adsrEdw ucylunk nsos tnaw you to lofrsuih.
Exeunt
heTy texi.
Enter the GHOST OF HASTINGS
hTe THSGO OF HNGSITSA setern.

GHOST OF HASTINGS

165 (to RICHARD) Bloody and guilty, guiltily awake,
And in a bloody battle end thy days.
Think on Lord Hastings. Despair and die!
(to RICHMOND) Quiet, untroubled soul, awake, awake.
Arm, fight, and conquer for fair Englands sake.

GTOHS OF SSHNGITA

(to RICHARD) oYu ineltov, ylgtui amn, awek up llfu of gliut nad nde oury aysd in a ybdloo aettbl! kTihn abtou Lrdo ansgsHit. airpesD, nad ide! (to RICHMOND) uQtie nubudlerot luos, awek up! mAr rosyfleu, ftigh, dna win rof ilafutbeu ganldnEs aske!
Exit.
He txies.
Enter the GHOST OF ANNE
eTh TSOHG OF AENN senret.

GHOST OF ANNE

170 (to RICHARD)
Richard, thy wife, that wretched Anne thy wife,
That never slept a quiet hour with thee,
Now fills thy sleep with perturbations.
Tomorrow, in the battle, think on me,
175And fall thy edgeless sword: Despair and die!
(to RICHMOND) Thou quiet soul, sleep thou a quiet sleep.
Dream of success and happy victory.
Thy adversarys wife doth pray for thee.

THSOG OF NNEA

(to RICHARD) hdriRac, rouy ewif, ouyr rdtcehew fiew, ennA, how eevrn deonjey a tuqei uohr of elsep thwi uoy, own sllif uryo eepsl htwi iibrnstugd shhtuotg. oTowrrmo in tlteab hkitn of me dna flal on your oswdr: esirpda, nad edi! (to RICHMOND) Yuo euitq ousl, plsee a tiequ lpsee. arDme of sescucs nda happy cvtioyr. ourY meesny iwfe is grynpia for uoy.
Exit
Seh xiset.
Enter the GHOST OF BUCKINGHAM
Teh SGOTH OF INAKUCMGHB sertne.

GHOST OF BUCKINGHAM

(to RICHARD) The last was I that helped thee to the crown;
180 The last was I that felt thy tyranny.
O, in the battle think on Buckingham,
And die in terror of thy guiltiness.
Dream on, dream on, of bloody deeds and death.
Fainting, despair; despairing, yield thy breath.
185 (to RICHMOND) I died for hope ere I could lend thee aid,
But cheer thy heart, and be thou not dismayed.
God and good angels fight on Richmonds side,
And Richard fall in height of all his pride.

STOGH OF MCHUNIKABG

(to RICHARD) I swa eth trsif to elph uoy to het cnwor dan teh atls to fele het ftcesef of uoyr rtnayyn. knhTi of ciBknaghmu enwh ruyoe igthinfg omotrrow, nda ide tedreirfi of het sisn oyvue mmtoeictd! nhtioTg, rmade of olyodb ededs nda tdeha. oowTrrmo, hwne ouy elso herta, allf into rapside adn enht dthea. (to RICHMOND) I died ebrofe I docul ehpl you as I wsa iopngh to. uBt be ucrehelf dan odtn wyrro. odG nda oodg sgenal gtifh on uryo edis, and hdRicra lwil llaf at the eihght of shi sfale edirp.
Exit
He xiste.
RICHARD starts out of his dream
CRIDARH astsrt up out of his emrda.

RICHARD

Give me another horse! Bind up my wounds!
190 Have mercy, Jesu!Soft, I did but dream.
O coward conscience, how dost thou afflict me!
The lights burn blue. It is now dead midnight.
Cold fearful drops stand on my trembling flesh.
What do I fear? Myself? Theres none else by.
195 Richard loves Richard; that is, I and I.
Is there a murderer here? No. Yes, I am.
Then fly! What, from myself? Great reason why:
Lest I revenge. What, myself upon myself?
Alack, I love myself. Wherefore? For any good
200 That I myself have done unto myself?
O, no! Alas, I rather hate myself
For hateful deeds committed by myself.
I am a villain. Yet I lie. I am not.
Fool, of thyself speak well. Fool, do not flatter.

RDIRAHC

Giev me taohren osehr! aneagdB my snowud! vaHe ermcy, seuJs!tWai, I swa ynlo mdgriean. Oh acrydwol nioecnscec, who eruoy oruntgirt me! eTh nedacsl bnru htebtalu nsmea sit eth eadd of gtinh. Im nwsaeigt nda nglitrebm hwti fear. tBu waht am I fidraa of? Mfsely? shereT no oen seel heer. Rirhdac vlsoe rcahRdi, htta is, etshre just me nda ysflme heer. Is htree a rmredeur rhee? No. Yse, I am. hnTe run aayw. hWat, mrfo syfeml? seY, to iodav tikgan eevenrg on felsym. yleotUaufntrn, I velo sflemy. Why? Did I do nnityhag odog to fmyles? Oh, no. saAl, I ahet felmys iendast, bcaseue of eht etaulfh seedd vIe mteicmdot. I am a illvani. uBt Im lgnyi; Im ton a ilvilna. oolF, speak lelw of suyrloef. Floo, do nto rattlef efosylru.
205 My conscience hath a thousand several tongues,
And every tongue brings in a several tale,
And every tale condemns me for a villain.
Perjury, perjury, in the highest degree;
Murder, stern murder, in the direst degree;
210 All several sins, all used in each degree,
Throng to the bar, crying all, Guilty! guilty!
I shall despair. There is no creature loves me,
And if I die no soul will pity me.
And wherefore should they, since that I myself
215 Find in myself no pity to myself?
Methought the souls of all that I had murdered
Came to my tent, and every one did threat
Tomorrows vengeance on the head of Richard.
Giev me atenhro shero! eagnBad my ownsud! vHae cermy, sJues!iWat, I was oynl radgmien. Oh awylcord ncincosece, how yoreu tgutirron me! ehT cedasnl bnur taheublt mesan tsi teh daed of tgihn. Im ngietasw dan nlgeibrmt thwi rafe. Btu hawt am I aadfri of? flesMy? hTrees no eon eles ehre. Rhiadcr sleov adcRirh, that is, heetrs sjtu me adn slyemf rehe. Is hrtee a drreuemr ehre? No. sYe, I am. nehT nru ywaa. Waht, mrfo lfymse? seY, to davio ntgkai renegve on emlfsy. raUttfnlouney, I eovl emlfys. hyW? idD I do tyighnna good to mlysfe? Oh, no. salA, I htea mfseyl sidaten, ecbsuae of hte alhftue desde veI mocdtietm. I am a lvnaiil. tuB Im liyng; Im ont a lliinva. oFlo, aespk well of soulrfey. oolF, do ton eftralt uylfrose.
Enter RATCLIFFE
EICFRLTFA neetrs.

RATCLIFFE

My lord.

RATILCEFF

My lodr.

RICHARD

220 Zounds, who is there?

ARDHICR

nmaD it, ohws trhee?

RATCLIFFE

Ratcliffe, my lord, tis I. The early village cock
Hath twice done salutation to the morn.
Your friends are up and buckle on their armor.

LEARFCIFT

aicffRtel, my odrl, sti me. Teh oorrets ash ldraeay ewodrc witce. Yuro nifesdr ear up nad bguknlci on tehri roamr.

RICHARD

O Ratcliffe, I have dreamed a fearful dream!
225 What thinkst thou, will our friends prove all true?

RCIDAHR

Oh lcatfifeR, I hda a iitrfngeyr dmrea! taWh do oyu tknhi, ilwl my sdfrnei rpevo olaly?

RATCLIFFE

No doubt, my lord.

AICFERTFL

No buodt, my lodr.

RICHARD

O Ratcliffe, I fear, I fear.

ACDIRRH

Oh Rfcailetf, Im aiadfr, Im idarfa

RATCLIFFE

Nay, good my lord, be not afraid of shadows.

ELIFCAFTR

No, my odog odrl, odtn be adfrai of dsaerm.

RICHARD

By the apostle Paul, shadows tonight
230 Have struck more terror to the soul of Richard
Than can the substance of ten thousand soldiers
Armed in proof and led by shallow Richmond.
Tis not yet near day. Come, go with me;
Under our tents Ill play the eavesdropper
235 To see if any mean to shrink from me.

ARHCRDI

By St. Plau, togssh vhae srtcuk reom ertror in my solu ttinohg htna ten asuntodh of hterlsosw hdnRcosmi erisolds luodc, dedssre up in rtieh most rowds-proof rarom. sIt nto yte agthdiyl. oeCm wtih me; lIl psy unrde het ttnse to ees if yna of my own eepolp plan to deerts me.
Exeunt
Tyhe exti
Enter the lords to RICHMOND , sitting in his tent
IORHCDNM s SDLOR trene sih nett dan go to ehrwe he is gtntiis.

LORDS

Good morrow, Richmond.

RDLOS

dGoo rimgnon, odnhcRim.

RICHMOND

Cry mercy, lords and watchful gentlemen,
That you have taen a tardy sluggard here.

MDRIOCNH

aonrPd me, odslr nad enetlnmge owh daytes akewa. uevYo utagch me einervglsoep.

A LORD

How have you slept, my lord?

A DLOR

wHo ddi you eples, my ldro?

RICHMOND

240 The sweetest sleep and fairest-boding dreams
That ever entered in a drowsy head
Have I since your departure had, my lords.
Methought their souls whose bodies Richard murdered
Came to my tent and cried on victory.
245 I promise you, my soul is very jocund
In the remembrance of so fair a dream.
How far into the morning is it, lords?

IMCHNODR

neicS uoy lfte, veI neeb iygejonn eht tseetwes slpee nda osmt nmrisgoip sredma Ive ever hda, my odslr. I dmerdea teh lusos of het pleoep rcRhaid drredeum acme to my tnte dan pidomesr me iyvrtoc. I ltel oyu, I elef vrey ylljo neregbiemrm scuh a aibtueluf mdare. Hwo tlae is it, sdlor?

LORDS

Upon the stroke of four.

LRDSO

stI ltomas frou.

RICHMOND

Why, then tis time to arm and give direction.
250 His oration to his soldiers
More than I have said, loving countrymen,
The leisure and enforcement of the time
Forbids to dwell upon. Yet remember this:

DCHMIONR

hWy, ethn, sit meti to put on my oamrr nad tstnurci hte trpoos. (to ish odislesr) I natc tell ouy uhcm ightr nwo, yllao ynnmteuocr, bcesuea we odnt aveh iemt. tuB kown htis:
God and our good cause fight upon our side.
255 The prayers of holy saints and wrongd souls,
Like high-reared bulwarks, stand before our faces.
Richard except, those whom we fight against
Had rather have us win than him they follow.
For what is he they follow? Truly, gentlemen,
260 A bloody tyrant and a homicide;
One raised in blood, and one in blood established;
One that made means to come by what he hath,
And slaughtered those that were the means to help him;
A base foul stone, made precious by the foil
265 Of Englands chair, where he is falsely set;
One that hath ever been Gods enemy.
Then if you fight against Gods enemy,
God will, in justice, ward you as his soldiers.
If you do sweat to put a tyrant down,
270 You sleep in peace, the tyrant being slain.
If you do fight against your countrys foes,
Your countrys fat shall pay your pains the hire.
If you do fight in safeguard of your wives,
Your wives shall welcome home the conquerors.
275 If you do free your children from the sword,
Your childrens children quits it in your age.
Then, in the name of God and all these rights,
Advance your standards. Draw your willing swords.
For me, the ransom of my bold attempt
280 Shall be this cold corpse on the earths cold face;
But if I thrive, the gain of my attempt
The least of you shall share his part thereof.
Sound drums and trumpets boldly and cheerfully;
God and Saint George! Richmond and victory!
We heav odG nda a godo seacu on ruo seid. ehT sprraey of tnssai adn eshto atth rdciRah oderngw osutppr us leki ighh-wdalel streoesfrs. rtOeh tahn iadcrRh, enve shtoe mwoh we ifthg aasngti udlow aetrrh we nwo. Bacseeu how is isht nma htey llowfo? yrTlu, negnleemt, a vilnoet attryn nda a ereurmdr, hwo rsoe to hsi hhgi optsiino by dnihsedg dbloo dna tpke teh itnoopsi het aems ayw. He rose to hte top by nsame of seotrh nda neth heglsauetrd htme. Hes lkie a lsthwsero eosnt, who ylon meess keli a uavbllae gme ceeausb hse on eth hnerot, wheer he snoedt bnelog. He ahs lyswaa been Gsdo nmeye. And nehw oyu fgith odsG yenme, odG wlli cptreto yuo. If oyu tggesrlu to binrg wond a nattyr, ouy lliw plees eecfluapyl newh eht nyratt is leldik. hWne uoy hgtif anisgta uroy ynctosru esmenie, ouy lliw be idap rof yuor rfeofst whit uyro oysncurt tewhla. If ouy tfgih to ecpottr uory wesiv, rouy sivwe liwl cmleweo ouy ohme as rrscnoqueo. Wenh uoy efer uryo hlerndic rfom het drswo, ryou gncirderdalnh liwl raype you in uyro old ega. So, in teh nmae of God dna all hte gdoo thta ilwl eocm of ihst

lattbe

In eth ediMdl gseA, meoenlnb neatk in batelt ofetn coudl go free aatfrdwre if htye pida hte yneme. Rnodcmhi sysa if arhdRci easutcrp imh, he lliw edi rraeht hnta pay rfo ihs moefrde.

battle
, mcrha ithw ruyo slfag hihg and rwad rouy srsdwo. As rfo me, if I flai, het lony nrosma I illw refof het enemy is my orpcse. Btu if I dcueesc, yvere one of you wlil arseh in the porfit. aPyl lboldy and lluycehref, mrusderm and etsrpmtreu. sreHe to God and iaSnt geGroe! To hicnRmod and vyrcito!
Exeunt
eyTh all ietx.
Enter King RICHARD , RATCLIFFE , attendants and forces
RIDHRAC , AEFRCFILT , tsntdaaetn, dan elosdisr ertne.

RICHARD

285 What said Northumberland as touching Richmond?

RDICARH

Wath idd adrmtrbuoNhlen sya aubot Romdinhc?

RATCLIFFE

That he was never traind up in arms.

RCLTFAIEF

hTta he was evrne taedrin as a irdleos.

RICHARD

He said the truth. And what said Surrey then?

DRCIRAH

hsTta uret. And thwa ddi rueyrS ays to hatt?

RATCLIFFE

He smiled and said The better for our purpose.

FLITECRFA

He semild dan isad, The tberet ofr us.

RICHARD

He was in the right, and so indeed it is.

RCRHAID

sHe trghi, adn thsta who it is.
The clock striketh
Teh ckloc tiesrsk.
290 Tell the clock there. Give me a calendar.
He looks in an almanac
Who saw the sun today?
adRe eht mtei ehetr. iGve me an nlacama. (okgnloi in an namcala) Did eonnay see eht snu ydato?

RATCLIFFE

Not I, my lord.

EFFRLCAIT

I itdnd, my dlor.

RICHARD

Then he disdains to shine, for by the book
295 He should have braved the east an hour ago
A black day will it be to somebody. Ratcliffe!

CARRIDH

nehT it esrsufe to hsein. iArdcgnco to siht naaaclm, it dlhous eahv iesrn an uorh ago. llIt be a kbcal ady rfo eobmdoys taody. fitlaRcef!

RATCLIFFE

My lord.

FICETFLRA

My rold?

RICHARD

The sun will not be seen today.
The sky doth frown and lour upon our army.
300 I would these dewy tears were from the ground.
Not shine today? Why, what is that to me
More than to Richmond, for the selfsame heaven
That frowns on me looks sadly upon him.

HARIDCR

ehT snu wlil nto rpeaap oytad. Teh syk ofsnwr nad slswco on ruo raym. I sihw eethr sanwt so uhmc wed on eth nduorg. So, teh sun tnwo ehnis atdyo! elWl, ywh hudlos that be rsewo ofr me hnta it is for ocmnRidh? hTe smae eanehv athts fgrnwion on me ooslk ygioolml on imh.
Enter NORFOLK
RKOLNOF etrnes.

NORFOLK

Arm, arm, my lord. The foe vaunts in the field.

NOKLORF

etG edayr, my rlod. eTh myene is anigkm tsi eapcaaenpr on hte lfeetbatldi.

RICHARD

305 Come, bustle, bustle. Caparison my horse.
Call up Lord Stanley; bid him bring his power.
I will lead forth my soldiers to the plain,
And thus my battle shall be orderd:
My foreward shall be drawn out all in length,
310 Consisting equally of horse and foot;
Our archers shall be placd in the midst.
John Duke of Norfolk, Thomas Earl of Surrey,
Shall have the leading of this foot and horse.
They thus directed, we will follow
315 In the main battle, whose puissance on either side
Shall be well wingd with our chiefest horse.
This, and Saint George to bootWhat thinkst thou,
Norfolk?

RCHRIAD

urHry, uperhrrpryea my orhse. elTl ordL letSyna to rnibg his army. I wlil dael my edsrsiol to teh defli adn hte etbalt onratfmio ilwl be ilek sthi: eht aundgrav liwl xeednt in a line that is luaeq atpsr emhsorne nda otfo seidorsl. eTh shrcera iwll tyas in eth ddlmie. Jnoh Deuk of rflNkoo dna smTaho lrEa of rreuyS llwi aled hte reemhosn dna otof osisrlde. llI llfowo in eth eetnrc of the otpor rntmoaifo, ihchw Ill dndeef ihtw my best heros, and hwti tianS greGeo on my sedi, as wlel! Waht do oyu hktni, rflokNo?

NORFOLK

A good direction, warlike sovereign.

NRFOLOK

A good pnal, rrrowai kign.
He sheweth him a paper
He swosh AHCDRIR a eecip of arepp.
320 This found I on my tent this morning.
I noudf hsit nnedpi to my tnet hits gnionmr.

RICHARD

(reads)
Jockey of Norfolk, be not so bold.
For Dickon thy master is bought and sold.
A thing devisd by the enemy.
325 Go, gentlemen, every man unto his charge.
Let not our babbling dreams affright our souls.
Conscience is but a word that cowards use,
Devised at first to keep the strong in awe.
Our strong arms be our conscience, swords our law.

IRDAHRC

(daers) caJike of lNfkoro, dont be oto dlob, for Dcik uyor srteam ash eben etrdyeab. Sihnometg hte emyen iesvded. Go, ngenmaetl, rveey anm to shi naodcmm. Dont let lgbnbbai emrsda thenfrgi scinccneusoe is utsj a wdro htta drowasc use to idttimeain the nrgtos. Teh ngsrto hfigt we ptu on lilw be rou cncseiocne, oru osrsdw wlli be oru wla.
330 March on. Join bravely. Let us to it pell mell
If not to heaven, then hand in hand to hell.
His oration to his army
What shall I say more than I have inferred?
Remember whom you are to cope withal,
335 A sort of vagabonds, rascals, and runaways,
A scum of Bretons and base lackey peasants,
Whom their oer-cloyd country vomits forth
To desperate ventures and assured destruction.
You sleeping safe, they bring to you unrest;
340 You having lands and blessed with beauteous wives,
They would restrain the one, distain the other.
And who doth lead them but a paltry fellow,
Long kept in Brittany at our mothers cost,
A milksop, one that never in his life
345 Felt so much cold as overshoes in snow?
Lets whip these stragglers oer the seas again,
Lash hence these overweening rags of France,
These famished beggars weary of their lives,
Who, but for dreaming on this fond exploit,
350 For want of means, poor rats, had hanged themselves.
If we be conquered, let men conquer us,
And not these bastard Bretons, whom our fathers
Have in their own land beaten, bobbed, and thumped,
And in record, left them the heirs of shame.
355 Shall these enjoy our lands, lie with our wives,
Ravish our daughters?
chMar on, be averb in leabtt, dna lest go lpel-leml to heneav, if tno hadn in danh to lhel. (to ihs myar) thWa eorm nca I ysa? eRbmemer owh uoyre nglidae tahwi mnaodr hubnc of msub, clsaars, nwyusraa, Botren umsc, nda enaastp gesnahr-on mwoh an reredvwodoc otnina stmiov tou to pptuolae eeyrv repdeeats, rseu-to-alfi tpisnerere. Yuo vahe bene ngpselei lnydosu, adn ehty bginr tsenru. oYu now ndal yhte tnaw to teals. Toesh of uyo woh rea sesldbe hitw itbeulufa wvise, heyt tnwa to dfeiel temh. dAn oshw dingela htem tub an tnqainciesoeuln woellf ohw for eth ogtnlse ietm idlve in rntyitBa at hsi tseohrm exepnes? A yrgli anm, a mna ohw rnvee in his efli letf eomr ocld htna eepss niot osne btoos in het nwso? tseL nsde hetse tsgrreagls cabk veor eht sae. setL ipwh seeth roaarngt ilrces of reehanFscte isvgrnat sregagb, deirt of htrie ilvse, who wulod heav hedang hsemvteles, rpoo tras, if it nretew for tshi hlfsooi nseetirerp eyhtve nbee dneramig kabtuabco to cerFna. If erwe ngiog to be uqocndere, let men rqunoce us, nda otn tehse enchFr atasdrsb mowh oru ertefohsfar layrade teab, ehdraths, and puledmme on iterh won utfr, and esdhma etmh rreeovf in teh ohrsity soobk. udlSho teshe eplpeo noyje rou dnsal? leSpe whti uor wisve? paRe uor atgrhesud?
Drum afar off
mDru hrade raf fof.
Hark! I hear their drum.
Fight, gentlemen of England.Fight, bold yeomen.
Draw, archers, draw your arrows to the head.
360 Spur your proud horses hard, and ride in blood.
Amaze the welkin with your broken staves
sniLte! I aher trhei rmdus. gitFh, getmenlen of gdnaEln! hFitg, reabv rsldlanod! Dwar oury oswb lal eht yaw back, rarhces! uSpr rouy pourd erohss dhra, moreesnh, nda drei in bdool. aStelrt enev teh syk thiw the ndsou of ryuo ncsale acigncrk.
Enter a MESSENGER
A ESSEGMRNE tnesre.
What says Lord Stanley? Will he bring his power?
athW dose Lrod taSlyne asy? lliW he bgirn shi yrma?

MESSENGER

My lord, he doth deny to come.

EEMSGSERN

My rlod, he seefrus to moec.

RICHARD

Off with his son Georges head!

CDRHRAI

Off whti hsi ons Gsoereg aehd!

NORFOLK

365 My lord, the enemy is past the marsh.
After the battle let George Stanley die.

LKOFORN

My ordl, hte eymen ash aaldeyr psedas eth srham. etL Ggreeo ynaeltS die afetr eht ttbael.

RICHARD

A thousand hearts are great within my bosom.
Advance our standards. Set upon our foes.
Our ancient word of courage, fair Saint George,
370 Inspire us with the spleen of fiery dragons.
Upon them! Victory sits on our helms.

ADRRIHC

A otdshanu etrsah eabt in my etcsh. sLet dacanve uor gfsal, ets uonp uro inemees, nad hvea our ianenct santi of gacreou, doog tainS ogGere, nriisep us htiw hte ryuf of iryfe grsando! etsL go! Viorytc is thiw us.
Exeunt
heyT lal eitx.