Richard III

by: William Shakespeare

  Act 4 Scene 2

page Act 4 Scene 2 Page 3

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PAGE

I know a discontented gentleman
Whose humble means match not his haughty spirit.
40Gold were as good as twenty orators,
And will, no doubt, tempt him to anything.

PAGE

My lord, I know one unhappy gentleman who has more pride than money. Money talks, and would very likely get him to do anything.

RICHARD

What is his name?

RICHARD

What’s his name?

PAGE

     His name, my lord, is Tyrrel.

PAGE

His name is Tyrrel, my lord.

RICHARD

I partly know the man. Go, call him hither, boy

RICHARD

I know the man a bit. Go, bring him here, boy.
Exit PAGE
The PAGE exits.
(aside) The deep-revolving witty Buckingham
45No more shall be the neighbor to my counsels
Hath he so long held out with me, untired,
And stops he now for breath? Well, be it so.
(to himself) The thoughtful, witty Buckingham will no longer be privy to my innermost thoughts. Has he held out for me for so long and without a moment’s doubt only to suddenly need some “breathing room”? Well, so be it.
Enter STANLEY
STANLEY enters.
How now, Lord Stanley, what’s the news?
Look who’s here! What’s the news with you?

STANLEY

Know, my long lord,
50The marquess Dorset, as I hear, is fled
To Richmond, in the parts where he abides.

STANLEY

You should know, my loving lord, I’ve heard that the marquess Dorset has fled to Brittany, to the earl of Richmond.
He walks aside
He stands aside.

RICHARD

Come hither, Catesby. Rumor it abroad
That Anne my wife is very grievous sick.
I will take order for her keeping close.
55Inquire me out some mean poor gentleman,
Whom I will marry straight to Clarence' daughter.
The boy is foolish, and I fear not him.
Look how thou dream’st! I say again, give out
That Anne my queen is sick and like to die.
60About it, for it stands me much upon
To stop all hopes whose growth may damage me.

RICHARD

Come here, Catesby. Spread the rumor abroad that Anne, my wife, is very sick. I will make sure she’s kept out of view. And find a poverty stricken gentleman who I can marry straightaway to Clarence’s daughter. Clarence’s son is dull-witted, so I’m not worried about him. Look at you, standing there in a stupor! I repeat, spread the rumor that Anne, my wife, is sick and likely to die. Hurry up because it’s absolutely crucial that I destroy anything that may damage my position.