Richard III

by: William Shakespeare

  Act 5 Scene 3

page Act 5 Scene 3 Page 2

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Enter RICHMOND, Sir William Brandon, OXFORD, DORSET, HERBERT, BLUNT, and others. Some of the soldiers pitch RICHMOND’s tent
RICHMOND, Sir William Brandon, OXFORD, DORSET, HERBERT, BLUNT, and others enter on the other side of the stage. Some soldiers pitch RICHMOND’s tent.

RICHMOND

20The weary sun hath made a golden set,
And by the bright track of his fiery car,
Gives token of a goodly day tomorrow.—
Sir William Brandon, you shall bear my standard.—
Give me some ink and paper in my tent;
25I’ll draw the form and model of our battle,
Limit each leader to his several charge,
And part in just proportion our small power.
My Lord of Oxford, you, Sir William Brandon,
And you, Sir Walter Herbert, stay with me.
30The earl of Pembroke keeps his regiment—
Good Captain Blunt, bear my goodnight to him,
And by the second hour in the morning
Desire the earl to see me in my tent.
Yet one thing more, good captain, do for me.
35Where is Lord Stanley quartered, do you know?

RICHMOND

The sunset was golden and left a bright track in the sky, which indicates that tomorrow will be a good day. Sir William Brandon, you will carry my flag. Bring some ink and paper to my tent, and I’ll draw a model of our battle, appoint each leader to his particular command, and carefully divide up our small army. My Lord of Oxford, you, Sir William Brandon, and you, Sir Walter Herbert, are going to stay with me. The earl of Pembroke will stick with his regiment. Good Captain Blunt, tell the earl goodnight from me, and tell him that by two in the morning I would like him to visit my tent. One more thing before you go, Blunt—where is Lord Stanley lodging, do you know?

BLUNT

Unless I have mista'en his colors much,
Which well I am assured I have not done,
His regiment lies half a mile, at least,
South from the mighty power of the king.

BLUNT

Unless I’ve mistaken his battle flags, which I’m sure I haven’t, his regiment lies at least half a mile south of the king’s mighty army.

RICHMOND

40If without peril it be possible,
Sweet Blunt, make some good means to speak with him,
And give him from me this most needful note.

RICHMOND

If it’s possible to do this without putting yourself in danger, dear Captain Blunt, say goodnight to him from me and give him this important note.
He hands him a paper
He hands him a paper

BLUNT

Upon my life, my lord, I’ll undertake it.
And so God give you quiet rest tonight!

BLUNT

Upon my life, my lord, I’ll do it. Have a restful night!