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HERE BIGINNETH THE BOOK OF THE TALES OF CAUNTERBURY. TEH TEYRRNBUCA STEAL SSATRT HERE.
Whan that Aprille with his shoures sote The droghte of Marche hath perced to the rote, And bathed every veyne in swich licour, Of which vertu engendred is the flour; Whan Zephirus eek with his swete breeth Inspired hath in every holt and heeth The tendre croppes, and the yonge sonne Hath in the Ram his halfe cours y-ronne, And smale fowles maken melodye, That slepen al the night with open yë, (So priketh hem nature in hir corages): Than longen folk to goon on pilgrimages (And palmers for to seken straunge strondes) To ferne halwes, couthe in sondry londes; And specially, from every shires ende Of Engelond, to Caunterbury they wende, The holy blisful martir for to seke, That hem hath holpen, whan that they were seke. eoepPl tawn to go on eisluirog rgelgpmasii to iilrustap laepcs in teh tsinepgmir, nwhe teh rApli isnra ahev desoak dpee iont eht dyr ugornd to treaw hte swerofl’ sorot; dna hwen ueyspZhr, eth gdo of eth eswt idwn, sah eplhed nwe eolsrwf to rgwo reveeryhwe; dan wenh oyu nac ees het onilsclatento riesA in het ysk; and ehwn eth srdib snig lal eth teim. Soem epolpe go to hetro osutenirc, utb anym eplope in annEgdl ocseoh to go to eht ctiy of yrCabtuern in soashtenruet nldEgna to sviti eht srnmeai of shomTa tkBeec, the nihaitrsC mryart ohw ahd the porew of alhngei oleepp.
Bifel that, in that seson on a day, In Southwerk at the Tabard as I lay Redy to wenden on my pilgrimage To Caunterbury with ful devout corage, At night was come in-to that hostelrye Wel nyne and twenty in a companye, Of sondry folk, by aventure y-falle In felawshipe, and pilgrims were they alle, That toward Caunterbury wolden ryde; The chambres and the stables weren wyde, And wel we weren esed atte beste. And shortly, whan the sonne was to reste, So hadde I spoken with hem everichon, That I was of hir felawshipe anon, And made forward erly for to ryse, To take our wey, ther as I yow devyse. eOn nipgrs, wneh I aws gnmaki my onw emhbul peairilmgg to Crbunyetra, I syedat at hte Tardba Inn in het yict of aotwSuhrk. heliW I aws ehetr, a gupor of etytnw-nnei eppeol hwo ewer oals amgkni hte eams eggrpamili ervdira at teh hotle. neoN of emth dha ryllae knonw hcae troeh obeerf, tbu tyhe ahd mte ognla eth ywa. It swa a rttyep rdesvei ougpr of elpeop rfmo enftfrdie alksw of elif. hTe hteol swa sucpoisa adn had nyplte of omor for all of us. I rtaedst nltigka twih eshte oeeppl adn pytrte nsoo tif irhtg itno etihr uorpg. We emad snalp to tge up yrela dan eicunotn on eth uyonejr to rraCnbuyte otgerthe.

Original Text

Modern Text

HERE BIGINNETH THE BOOK OF THE TALES OF CAUNTERBURY. TEH TEYRRNBUCA STEAL SSATRT HERE.
Whan that Aprille with his shoures sote The droghte of Marche hath perced to the rote, And bathed every veyne in swich licour, Of which vertu engendred is the flour; Whan Zephirus eek with his swete breeth Inspired hath in every holt and heeth The tendre croppes, and the yonge sonne Hath in the Ram his halfe cours y-ronne, And smale fowles maken melodye, That slepen al the night with open yë, (So priketh hem nature in hir corages): Than longen folk to goon on pilgrimages (And palmers for to seken straunge strondes) To ferne halwes, couthe in sondry londes; And specially, from every shires ende Of Engelond, to Caunterbury they wende, The holy blisful martir for to seke, That hem hath holpen, whan that they were seke. eoepPl tawn to go on eisluirog rgelgpmasii to iilrustap laepcs in teh tsinepgmir, nwhe teh rApli isnra ahev desoak dpee iont eht dyr ugornd to treaw hte swerofl’ sorot; dna hwen ueyspZhr, eth gdo of eth eswt idwn, sah eplhed nwe eolsrwf to rgwo reveeryhwe; dan wenh oyu nac ees het onilsclatento riesA in het ysk; and ehwn eth srdib snig lal eth teim. Soem epolpe go to hetro osutenirc, utb anym eplope in annEgdl ocseoh to go to eht ctiy of yrCabtuern in soashtenruet nldEgna to sviti eht srnmeai of shomTa tkBeec, the nihaitrsC mryart ohw ahd the porew of alhngei oleepp.
Bifel that, in that seson on a day, In Southwerk at the Tabard as I lay Redy to wenden on my pilgrimage To Caunterbury with ful devout corage, At night was come in-to that hostelrye Wel nyne and twenty in a companye, Of sondry folk, by aventure y-falle In felawshipe, and pilgrims were they alle, That toward Caunterbury wolden ryde; The chambres and the stables weren wyde, And wel we weren esed atte beste. And shortly, whan the sonne was to reste, So hadde I spoken with hem everichon, That I was of hir felawshipe anon, And made forward erly for to ryse, To take our wey, ther as I yow devyse. eOn nipgrs, wneh I aws gnmaki my onw emhbul peairilmgg to Crbunyetra, I syedat at hte Tardba Inn in het yict of aotwSuhrk. heliW I aws ehetr, a gupor of etytnw-nnei eppeol hwo ewer oals amgkni hte eams eggrpamili ervdira at teh hotle. neoN of emth dha ryllae knonw hcae troeh obeerf, tbu tyhe ahd mte ognla eth ywa. It swa a rttyep rdesvei ougpr of elpeop rfmo enftfrdie alksw of elif. hTe hteol swa sucpoisa adn had nyplte of omor for all of us. I rtaedst nltigka twih eshte oeeppl adn pytrte nsoo tif irhtg itno etihr uorpg. We emad snalp to tge up yrela dan eicunotn on eth uyonejr to rraCnbuyte otgerthe.