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CLEOPATRA

                                                                               Oh!

CLEOPATRA

Oh!

THIDIAS

The scars upon your honor therefore he
60Does pity as constrainèd blemishes,
Not as deserved.

THIDIAS

So he regrets that any dishonorable acts were forced on you, not being performed of your own free will.

CLEOPATRA

                                 He is a god and knows
What is most right. Mine honor was not yielded,
But conquered merely.

CLEOPATRA

He is like a god and knows the truth. My honor wasn’t given; it was only dominated.

ENOBARBUS

                                (aside) To be sure of that,
I will ask Antony. Sir, sir, thou art so leaky
65That we must leave thee to thy sinking, for
Thy dearest quit thee.

ENOBARBUS

(aside) I’ll go get the truth of this from Antony. Sir, sir, are you so badly off that we must abandon you to your fate? Even your dearest friend has abandoned you.
Exit ENOBARBUS
ENOBARBUS exits.

THIDIAS

                                            Shall I say to Caesar
What you require of him? For he partly begs
To be desired to give. It much would please him
That of his fortunes you should make a staff
70To lean upon. But it would warm his spirits
To hear from me you had left Antony
And put yourself under his shroud,
The universal landlord.

THIDIAS

Shall I tell Caesar what you request from him? He almost begs for the opportunity to help you. It would please him very much if you would rely on his wealth and success to support you. But he would feel even better if I could tell him that you had left Antony and put yourself under his protection.

CLEOPATRA

                                               What’s your name?

CLEOPATRA

What’s your name?

THIDIAS

My name is Thidias.

THIDIAS

My name is Thidias.

CLEOPATRA

                                         Most kind messenger,
75Say to great Caesar this in deputation:
I kiss his conqu’ring hand. Tell him I am prompt
To lay my crown at ’s feet, and there to kneel.
Tell him, from his all-obeying breath I hear
The doom of Egypt.

CLEOPATRA

Most kind messenger, tell great Caesar that through his deputy I kiss his conquering hand. Tell him I am ready to lay my crown at his feet and kneel before him. Tell him—whose decrees are obeyed by the whole world—that I will accept the fate he chooses for Egypt.