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                            Take hence this jack and whip him.
Take away this lout and whip him.

ENOBARBUS

(aside) ’Tis better playing with a lion’s whelp
Than with an old one dying.

ENOBARBUS

(aside) It’s safer to toy with a lion cub than an old, dying lion.

ANTONY

                                                        Moon and stars!
Whip him. Were ’t twenty of the greatest tributaries
That do acknowledge Caesar, should I find them
100So saucy with the hand of she here—what’s her name
Since she was Cleopatra? Whip him, fellows,
Till like a boy, you see him cringe his face
And whine aloud for mercy. Take him hence.

ANTONY

By the moon and stars! Whip him! If I saw twenty of the greatest powers that pay tribute to Caesar taking such liberties with her hand—what’s her name now? This woman who once was Cleopatra, but now has become something different? Whip him, fellows, until he screws up his face like a baby and cries aloud for mercy! Take him away.

THIDIAS

Mark Antony—

THIDIAS

Mark Antony—

ANTONY

                                 Tug him away! Being whipped,
105Bring him again. This jack of Caesar’s shall
Bear us an errand to him.

ANTONY

Pull him away, and once he has been whipped, bring him back. Caesar’s knave will bring him a message for us.
Exeunt SERVANTS with THIDIAS
The SERVANTS exit with THIDIAS.
(to CLEOPATRA ) You were half blasted ere I knew you. Ha!
Have I my pillow left unpressed in Rome,
Forborne the getting of a lawful race,
110And by a gem of women, to be abused
By one that looks on feeders?
(to CLEOPATRA ) You were damaged goods before I met you. Ha! Did I desert my bed in Rome, passing up the chance to have a legitimate family with a jewel of a woman, in order to be deceived by one who wastes her favors on servants?

CLEOPATRA

                                                         Good my lord—

CLEOPATRA

My good lord—

ANTONY

You have been a boggler ever.
But when we in our viciousness grow hard—
Oh, misery on ’t!—the wise gods seel our eyes,
115In our own filth drop our clear judgments, make us
Adore our errors, laugh at ’s while we strut
To our confusion.

ANTONY

You’ve always been a liar. But when our vices become habits—Oh, the sadness of it!—the wise gods blind us, shade our better judgment, make us love our mistakes, and laugh as we strut to our ruin.