Antony and Cleopatra

William Shakespeare
No Fear Act 1 Scene 3
No Fear Act 1 Scene 3 Page 2

Original Text

Modern Text

ANTONY

                                     Now, my dearest Queen—

ANTONY

Now, my dearest Queen—

CLEOPATRA

Pray you, stand farther from me.

CLEOPATRA

Please, stand farther away from me.

ANTONY

                                                                What’s the matter?

ANTONY

What’s the matter?

CLEOPATRA

I know by that same eye there’s some good news.
20What, says the married woman you may go?
Would she had never given you leave to come!
Let her not say ’tis I that keep you here.
I have no power upon you. Hers you are.

CLEOPATRA

I can see in your eyes there’s been some good news. What, does your wife say you can come home? I wish she’d never let you come. Don’t let her say I kept you. I have no power over you. You belong to her.

ANTONY

The gods best know—

ANTONY

The gods know—

CLEOPATRA

                                             Oh never was there queen
25So mightily betrayed! Yet at the first
I saw the treasons planted.

CLEOPATRA

Oh, never has a queen been so betrayed as I have been. I knew from the first it would be this way.

ANTONY

                                                    Cleopatra—

ANTONY

Cleopatra—

CLEOPATRA

Why should I think you can be mine, and true—
Though you in swearing shake the thronèd gods—
Who have been false to Fulvia? Riotous madness,
30To be entangled with those mouth-made vows
Which break themselves in swearing!

CLEOPATRA

How could I have ever thought that you would be faithful and true, even though your vows of love shook the heavens themselves—you, who were unfaithful to Fulvia? It was wild insanity to believe promises made by the mouth and not the heart. Such false vows are broken as soon as they are spoken.

ANTONY

                                                                      Most sweet Queen—

ANTONY

Most sweet Queen—

CLEOPATRA

Nay, pray you, seek no color for your going,
But bid farewell and go. When you sued staying,
Then was the time for words. No going then!
35Eternity was in our lips and eyes,
Bliss in our brows’ bent, none our parts so poor
But was a race of heaven. They are so still,
Or thou, the greatest soldier of the world,
Art turned the greatest liar.

CLEOPATRA

No, please don’t try to excuse your departure. Just say good-bye and go. When you begged to stay, that was the time for words. You didn’t want to go then! You saw eternity in my lips and eyes, and happiness in the arch of my eyebrows. Then, all my parts seemed angelic to you. My features are still that beautiful—or else you, the greatest soldier in the world, have become the greatest liar by overpraising them.