Antony and Cleopatra

by: William Shakespeare

  Act 4 Scene 15

page Act 4 Scene 15 Page 3

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They heave ANTONY aloft to CLEOPATRA
They lift ANTONY up to CLEOPATRA.
And welcome, welcome! Die when thou hast lived.
Quicken with kissing. Had my lips that power,
40Thus would I wear them out.
And welcome, welcome! Die where you have lived, in my arms. Let me revive you with my kisses. If my lips had the power to give life, I would wear them out like this.
She kisses him
She kisses him.

ALL

A heavy sight!

ALL

What a sad sight!

ANTONY

I am dying, Egypt, dying.
Give me some wine and let me speak a little.

ANTONY

I am dying, Cleopatra, dying. Give me some wine and let me say a few words.

CLEOPATRA

No, let me speak, and let me rail so high
45That the false huswife Fortune break her wheel,
Provoked by my offense.

CLEOPATRA

ANTONY

                                                One word, sweet Queen:
Of Caesar seek your honor, with your safety—Oh!

ANTONY

One thing, dear Queen: request honor, as well as safety, from Caesar. Oh!

CLEOPATRA

They do not go together.

CLEOPATRA

Honor and safety do not go together.

ANTONY

                                                Gentle, hear me.
None about Caesar trust but Proculeius.

ANTONY

Dear, listen to me: don’t trust any of Caesar’s men besides Proculeius.

CLEOPATRA

50My resolution and my hands I’ll trust,
None about Caesar.

CLEOPATRA

I’ll trust my determination and my hands, but none of Caesar’s men.

ANTONY

The miserable change now at my end
Lament nor sorrow at, but please your thoughts
In feeding them with those my former fortunes,
55Wherein I lived the greatest prince o’ th’ world,
The noblest, and do now not basely die,
Not cowardly put off my helmet to
My countryman—a Roman by a Roman
Valiantly vanquished. Now my spirit is going.
60I can no more.

ANTONY

Don’t mourn over this unhappy reversal of fortune at the end of my life. Remember my earlier lot, when I lived as the greatest, most noble prince in the world. I’m not dying shamefully, doffing my helmet to my countryman like a coward, but as a Roman, honorably conquered by another Roman. Now I feel my soul leaving. I can’t speak any more.