Henry V

by: William Shakespeare

  Act 3 Scene 6

page Act 3 Scene 6 Page 4

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trick up with new-tuned oaths; and what a beard of the general’s cut and a horrid suit of the camp will do among foaming bottles and ale-washed wits is wonderful to be thought on. But you must learn to know such slanders of the age, or else you may be marvelously mistook.
shot, who was disgraced, what terms the enemy insisted on. And they study how to express these things in proper military jargon, which they embellish with fashionable oaths. And what a beard trimmed like the general’s or a rough uniform will do among foaming mugs and brains washed with ale, you wouldn’t believe. But you must learn to recognize such liars, or you will be greatly taken advantage of.

FLUELLEN

I tell you what, Captain Gower. I do perceive he is not the man that he would gladly make show to the world he is. If I find a hole in his coat, I will tell him my mind.

FLUELLEN

I tell you what, Captain Gower; I perceive that he is not the man that he would have the world think he is. If I find an opportunity, I will give him a piece of my mind.
Drum and colors Enter KING HENRY, GLOUCESTER, and soldiers
KING HENRY, GLOUCESTER, and soldiers enter, with a drum roll and military flags.
Hark you, the king is coming, and I must speak with him from the pridge.—God pless your Majesty.
Listen. The king is coming, and I must speak with him about what went on at the bridge.—God bless your Majesty!

KING HENRY

How now, Fluellen, cam’st thou from the bridge?

KING HENRY

Tell me, Fluellen: did you just come from the bridge?

FLUELLEN

80Ay, so please your Majesty. The duke of Exeter has very gallantly maintained the pridge. The French is gone off, look you, and there is gallant and most prave passages. Marry, th' athversary was have possession of the pridge, but he is enforced to retire, and the duke of Exeter is master of the pridge. I can tell your Majesty, the duke is a prave man.

FLUELLEN

Yes, your Majesty. The duke of Exeter has held the bridge very gallantly. The French have retreated, see, and there were great acts of courage. Indeed, the enemy nearly took the bridge, but he was forced to retreat, and the duke of Exeter holds the bridge. I can tell your Majesty, the duke is a brave man.

KING HENRY

What men have you lost, Fluellen?

KING HENRY

What men have you lost, Fluellen?

FLUELLEN

The perdition of th' athversary hath been very great, reasonable great. Marry, for my part, I think the duke hath lost never a man, but one that is like to be executed for robbing a church, one Bardolph, if your Majesty know the man. His face is all bubukles and whelks and knobs and flames o' fire; and his lips blows at his nose, and it is like a coal of fire, sometimes plue and sometimes red, but his nose is executed, and his fire’s out.

FLUELLEN

The enemy’s losses have been very great, pretty substantial. To tell the truth, though, I think the duke hasn’t lost a single man, except for one who will probably be executed for robbing a church, one Bardolph—I don’t know if your Majesty knows the man. His face is all pustules and pockmarks, and pimples and inflammation, and his lips blow up toward his nose, which is like a red-hot coal, sometimes blue, sometimes red. But his nose is dead, and the fire’s put out.