No Fear Act 4 Scene 7
No Fear Act 4 Scene 7 Page 4

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KING HENRY

I tell thee truly, herald,
I know not if the day be ours or no,
80For yet a many of your horsemen peer
And gallop o'er the field.

KING HENRY

I’ll be honest with you, herald: I don’t even know who won the battle. I still see many of your horsemen galloping across the field.

MONTJOY

The day is yours.

MONTJOY

You won it.

KING HENRY

Praised be God, and not our strength, for it!
What is this castle called that stands hard by?

KING HENRY

God, not our strength, be praised! What is the name of the castle that stands over there?

MONTJOY

85They call it Agincourt.

MONTJOY

Agincourt.

KING HENRY

Then call we this the field of Agincourt,
Fought on the day of Crispin Crispianus.

KING HENRY

Then we’ll call this the Battle of Agincourt, fought on the day of Crispin Crispianus.

FLUELLEN

Your grandfather of famous memory, an’t please your Majesty, and your great-uncle Edward the Plack Prince of Wales, as I have read in the chronicles, fought a most prave pattle here in France.

FLUELLEN

If I may say so, your Majesty, your famous grandfather and your great-uncle Edward, the Black Prince of Wales—or so I’ve read in the history books—fought a very brave battle here in France.

KING HENRY

They did, Fluellen.

KING HENRY

They did, Fluellen.

FLUELLEN

Your Majesty says very true. If your Majesties is remembered of it, the Welshmen did good service in a garden where leeks did grow, wearing leeks in their Monmouth caps, which, your Majesty know, to this hour is an honorable badge of the service. And I do believe your Majesty takes no scorn to wear the leek upon Saint Tavy’s day.

FLUELLEN

Your Majesty is quite right. If your Majesties recall it, the Welsh fought very valiantly in a garden where there were leeks growing, wearing leeks in their Monmouth caps which, your Majesty knows, is to this day a badge of honorable military service. I do believe your Majesty takes no shame in wearing the leek on Saint Davy’s Day.