No Fear Act 4 Scene 8
No Fear Act 4 Scene 8 Page 4

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FLUELLEN

It is with a good will. I can tell you it will serve you to mend your shoes. Come, wherefore should you be so pashful? Your shoes is not so good. 'Tis a good silling, I warrant you, or I will change it.

FLUELLEN

It’s meant in good will. I tell you, you can use it to get your shoes fixed. Come, why be so hesitant? Your shoes are in pretty bad shape. It’s a good shilling, I promise you. If not, I’ll get another one for you.
Enter an English HERALD
An English HERALD nters.

KING HENRY

65Now, herald, are the dead numbered?

KING HENRY

Now, herald, have the dead been counted?

HERALD

Here is the number of the slaughtered French.

HERALD

Here is the count of the slaughtered French.

KING HENRY

What prisoners of good sort are taken, uncle?

KING HENRY

What prisoners of rank have been taken, uncle?

EXETER

Charles, duke of Orléans, nephew to the king;
John, duke of Bourbon, and Lord Bouciqualt.
70Of other lords and barons, knights and squires,
Full fifteen hundred, besides common men.

EXETER

Charles duke of Orléans, nephew to the king; John duke of Bourbon, and Lord Bouciqualt: of other lords and barons, knights and squires, a full fifteen hundred, besides common men.

KING HENRY

This note doth tell me of ten thousand French
That in the field lie slain. Of princes in this number
And nobles bearing banners, there lie dead
75One hundred twenty-six. Added to these,
Of knights, esquires, and gallant gentlemen,
Eight thousand and four hundred, of the which,
Five hundred were but yesterday dubbed knights.
So that in these ten thousand they have lost,
80There are but sixteen hundred mercenaries.
The rest are princes, barons, lords, knights, squires,
And gentlemen of blood and quality.
The names of those their nobles that lie dead:
Charles Delabreth, high constable of France;
85Jaques of Chatillon, admiral of France;
The Master of the Crossbows, Lord Rambures;

KING HENRY

This paper tells me of ten thousand Frenchmen who lie dead on the battlefield. Among them are one hundred twenty-six princes and standard-bearing nobles. Add to these eight thousand four hundred knights, squires, and brave gentlemen, five hundred of whom were given the title of knight only yesterday. Among the ten thousand the French have lost only sixteen hundred are mercenaries. The rest of the dead are princes, barons, lords, knights, squires, and gentlemen of birth and rank. The names of those of their nobles that lie dead: Charles Delabreth, high constable of France; Jaques of Chatillon, admiral of France; the master of the crossbows, Lord Rambures; Great Master of France, the brave Sir Guichard Dolphin, John duke of Alençon, Anthony duke of Brabant, the brother of the duke of Burgundy, and Edward duke of Bar. Of brave earls, Grandpré and Roussi, Fauconberg and Foix, Beaumont and Marle, Vaudemont and Lestrale. Here was a