Henry V

by: William Shakespeare

  Act 5 Scene 2

page Act 5 Scene 2 Page 5

Original Text

Modern Text

KING HENRY

I said so, dear Katherine; and I must not blush to affirm it.

KING HENRY

I said so, dear Katherine, and I’m not ashamed to repeat it.

KATHERINE

115 Ô bon Dieu! Les langues des hommes sont pleines de tromperies.

KATHERINE

(in French) Oh, Lord! The tongues of men are full of deceit.

KING HENRY

What says she, fair one? That the tongues of men are full of deceits?

KING HENRY

(to ALICE) What does she say, pretty one? That the tongues of men are full of deceits?

ALICE

Oui, dat de tongues of de mans is be full of deceits; dat is de princess.

ALICE

Oui, dat de tongues of de mans is be full of deceits: dere’s de princess for you.

KING HENRY

The princess is the better Englishwoman.—I' faith, Kate, my wooing is fit for thy understanding. I am glad thou canst speak no better English, for if thou couldst, thou wouldst find me such a plain king that thou wouldst think I had sold my farm to buy my crown. I know no ways to mince it in love, but directly to say, “I love you.” Then if you urge me farther than to say, “Do you, in faith?” I wear out my suit. Give me your answer, i' faith, do; and so clap hands and a bargain. How say you, lady?

KING HENRY

How very English of her. Kate, my wooing is fit for your understanding: I am glad your English isn’t better. If it were, you would find me such an ordinary king that you would think I’d sold my farm to buy my crown. I don’t know any fancy ways of talking about love, only to say right out, “I love you.” If you press me any further than with the question, “Do you really?” my love scene is over. So give me your answer, and we’ll shake on it. Deal?

KATHERINE

130 Sauf votre honneur, me understand vell.

KATHERINE

With all due respect, me understand well.

KING HENRY

Marry, if you would put me to verses or to dance for your sake, Kate, why you undid me. For the one, I have neither words nor measure; and for the other, I have no strength in measure, yet a reasonable measure in strength. If I could win a lady at leapfrog or by vaulting into my saddle with my armor on my back, under the correction of bragging be it spoken, I should quickly leap into a wife. Or if I might buffet for my love or bound my horse for her favors, I could lay on like a butcher and sit like a jackanapes, never off. But, before God, Kate, I cannot look greenly nor gasp out my eloquence, nor I have no cunning in protestation, only

KING HENRY

Really, if you were thinking of having me write poetry or dance for you, Kate, you’ve defeated me already. I have no gift for the one and no strength for the other, though I have the gift of strength. If I could win a lady by playing leapfrog or vaulting into my saddle with my armor on my back—though you may accuse me of boasting—I could easily get myself a wife. I can fight with my fists and rear my horse up without falling off him, if either of those things could win me love. But,