Henry V

by: William Shakespeare

  Act 5 Scene 2

page Act 5 Scene 2 Page 6

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downright oaths, which I never use till urged, nor never break for urging. If thou canst love a fellow of this temper, Kate, whose face is not worth sunburning, that never looks in his glass for love of anything he sees there, let thine eye be thy cook. I speak to thee plain soldier. If thou canst love me for this, take me. If not, to say to thee that I shall die is true, but for thy love, by the Lord, no. Yet I love thee too. And while thou liv’st, dear Kate, take a fellow of plain and uncoined constancy, for he perforce must do thee right because he hath not the gift to woo in other places. For these fellows of infinite tongue, that can rhyme themselves into ladies' favors, they do always reason themselves out again. What? A speaker is but a prater, a rhyme is but a ballad, a good leg will fall, a straight back will stoop, a black beard will turn white, a curled pate will grow bald, a fair face will wither, a full eye will wax hollow, but a good heart, Kate, is the sun and the moon, or rather the sun and not the moon, for it shines bright and never changes but keeps his course truly. If thou would have such a one, take me. And take me, take a soldier. Take a soldier, take a king. And what say’st thou then to my love? Speak, my fair, and fairly, I pray thee.
before God, Kate, I cannot turn pale on purpose or gasp out fancy phrases, and I have no gift for clever declarations, only blunt oaths, which I never use till I’m asked and never break no matter who asks me. If you can love a man of this temperament, Kate, whose face a sunburn wouldn’t make any worse and who never looks in the mirror to admire himself, let your eye improve me. I speak to you as a plain soldier. If you can love me for this, take me. If not, to tell you I will die is true, but not for love, by God. And yet I do love you. So take for life a fellow of pure and plain faithfulness. He’s bound to be true to you as he won’t be up to flirting with other women. These chatty fellows who can rhyme their way into a lady’s good graces always reason themselves out again. Look, a talker is just a gabber; a poem is just a rhyme. A good leg will shrink, a straight back stoop, a black beard turn white, a curly head grow bald, an attractive face grow wrinkled and a pretty eye hollow. But a good heart, Kate, is the sun and the moon, or, rather, the sun, and not the moon, for it goes on shining brightly forever. If you would have such a man, take me. Take me and get a soldier; take a soldier and get a king. So what do you say to my suit? Speak, my fair one, and speak fairly, I beg you.

KATHERINE

Is it possible dat I sould love de enemy of France?

KATHERINE

Is it possible dat I sould love de enemy of France?

KING HENRY

No, it is not possible you should love the enemy of France, Kate. But, in loving me, you should love the friend of France, for I love France so well that I will not part with a village of it. I will have it all mine. And, Kate, when France is mine and I am yours, then yours is France and you are mine.

KING HENRY

No, it is not possible you should love the enemy of France, Kate. But in loving me, you would love the friend of France, for I love France so much that I will not part with a single village of it. I will have it all mine. And, Kate, when France is mine and I am yours, then France is yours and you are mine.

KATHERINE

170I cannot tell wat is dat.

KATHERINE

I don’t understand all dat.