Much Ado About Nothing

by: William Shakespeare

  Act 3 Scene 2

page Act 3 Scene 2 Page 4

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BENEDICK

55Yet is this no charm for the toothache.—Old Signior, walk
aside with me. I have studied eight or nine wise words to
speak to you, which these hobbyhorses must not hear.

BENEDICK

This chatter is no cure for my toothache. (to LEONATO) Old sir, please walk with me a bit. I have eight or nine well-considered words to say to you, and I don’t want these fools to hear.
Exeunt BENEDICK andLEONATO
BENEDICK and LEONATO exit.

DON PEDRO

For my life, to break with him about Beatrice!

DON PEDRO

I bet my life he’s gone to speak with Leonato about Beatrice!

CLAUDIO

'Tis even so. Hero and Margaret have by this played their
60parts with Beatrice, and then the two bears will not bite one
another when they meet.

CLAUDIO

It must be. By now, Hero and Margaret have done their part with Beatrice. The two bears won’t bite each other the next time they meet.
Enter DON JOHN
DON JOHN enters.

DON JOHN

My lord and brother, God save you.

DON JOHN

My lord and brother, God save you.

DON PEDRO

Good e'en, brother.

DON PEDRO

Good evening, brother.

DON JOHN

If your leisure served, I would speak with you.

DON JOHN

If you don’t mind, I’d like to speak with you.

DON PEDRO

65In private?

DON PEDRO

In private?

DON JOHN

If it please you. Yet Count Claudio may hear, for what I
would speak of concerns him.

DON JOHN

If you wish. But Count Claudio can stay, for what I’m about to say concerns him.

DON PEDRO

What’s the matter?

DON PEDRO

What’s the matter?

DON JOHN

(to CLAUDIO) Means your lordship to be married tomorrow?

DON JOHN

(to CLAUDIO) Do you plan on getting married tomorrow?

DON PEDRO

70You know he does.

DON PEDRO

You know that he does.

DON JOHN

I know not that, when he knows what I know.

DON JOHN

I don’t know that, once he knows what I know.