Much Ado About Nothing

William Shakespeare
No Fear Act 3 Scene 4
No Fear Act 3 Scene 4 Page 2

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MARGARET

By my troth, ’s but a nightgown in respect of yours—cloth
o' gold, and cuts, and laced with silver, set with pearls,
down sleeves, side sleeves, and skirts, round underborne
with a bluish tinsel. But for a fine, quaint, graceful, and
20excellent fashion, yours is worth ten on ’t.

MARGARET

Compared to your dress, it’s no better than a nightgown. The cloth is interwoven with gold thread, and slashes in the material show the fabric beneath. It is trimmed with silver lace and embroidered with pearls. It has one set of fitted sleeves and another ornamental pair that hangs open from the shoulders. The skirts are trimmed with a blue, metallic fabric. But for a fine, elegant, graceful, and excellent dress, yours is worth ten of those.

HERO

God give me joy to wear it, for my heart is exceeding heavy.

HERO

I hope I enjoy wearing it, for my heart is very heavy.

MARGARET

'Twill be heavier soon by the weight of a man.

MARGARET

It will be made even heavier soon—by the weight of a man.

HERO

Fie upon thee! Art not ashamed?

HERO

Watch your tongue! Have you no shame?

MARGARET

Of what, lady? Of speaking honorably? Is not marriage
25honorable in a beggar? Is not your lord honorable without
marriage? I think you would have me say, “Saving your
reverence, a husband.” An bad thinking do not wrest true
speaking, I’ll offend nobody. Is there any harm in “the
heavier for a husband”? None, I think, an it be the right
30husband and the right wife. Otherwise, ’tis light and not
heavy. Ask my Lady Beatrice else. Here she comes.

MARGARET

Shame of what, lady? Sex and marriage are honorable things—even for a beggar, right? And isn’t your husband an honorable man? You’re so prudish you’d probably like me to say, “I beg your pardon, your husband”—as if husband were a dirty word! So long as suspicious minds aren’t misinterpreting my honest words, I’ll offend no one. What’s wrong with admitting your husband’s going to lie on you? Nothing, as long as it’s the right husband with the right wife. That’s right and proper—anything else is frivolous and immoral. Ask Beatrice. Here she comes.
Enter BEATRICE
BEATRICE enters.

HERO

Good morrow, coz.

HERO

Good morning, cousin.

BEATRICE

Good morrow, sweet Hero.

BEATRICE

Good morning, sweet Hero.