Much Ado About Nothing

William Shakespeare
No Fear Act 4 Scene 1
No Fear Act 4 Scene 1 Page 13

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BENEDICK

Tarry, sweet Beatrice.

BENEDICK

Wait, sweet Beatrice.

BEATRICE

I am gone, though I am here. There is no love in you. Nay,
290I pray you let me go.

BEATRICE

My body waits here, but the rest of me is gone. You don’t really love me. I beg you to let me go.

BENEDICK

Beatrice—

BENEDICK

Beatrice—

BEATRICE

In faith, I will go.

BEATRICE

I swear, I’m going.

BENEDICK

We’ll be friends first.

BENEDICK

Not until we part as friends.

BEATRICE

You dare easier be friends with me than fight with mine
295enemy.

BEATRICE

How dare you try to be my friend when you refuse to fight my enemy.

BENEDICK

Is Claudio thine enemy?

BENEDICK

Is Claudio your enemy?

BEATRICE

Is he not approved in the height a villain, that hath
slandered, scorned, dishonored my kinswoman? Oh, that I
were a man! What, bear her in hand until they come to take
300hands and then, with public accusation, uncovered
slander, unmitigated rancor—O God, that I were a man! I
would eat his heart in the marketplace.

BEATRICE

Hasn’t he proven himself to be a great villain—slandering, scorning, and dishonoring my cousin? Oh, I wish I were a man! He pretended that everything was fine until the moment they were exchanging vows, and then—with public accusation, blatant slander, pure hatred—Oh God, if only I were a man! I would rip his heart out in public and eat it.

BENEDICK

Hear me, Beatrice—

BENEDICK

Listen to me, Beatrice—

BEATRICE

Talk with a man out at a window! A proper saying!

BEATRICE

Talking with a man outside her bedroom window! A likely story!

BENEDICK

305Nay, but Beatrice—

BENEDICK

No, but Beatrice—

BEATRICE

Sweet Hero, she is wronged, she is slandered, she is
undone.

BEATRICE

Sweet Hero, she’s been wronged, she’s been slandered, she’s been ruined.

BENEDICK

Beat—

BENEDICK

Beat—