Much Ado About Nothing

by: William Shakespeare

  Act 5 Scene 4

page Act 5 Scene 4 Page 2

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BENEDICK

20To bind me or undo me, one of them.—
Signior Leonato, truth it is, good Signior,
Your niece regards me with an eye of favor.

BENEDICK

To tie me up, or to undo me: one or the other. Signior Leonato, the truth is, your niece likes me.

LEONATO

That eye my daughter lent her; ’tis most true.

LEONATO

She sees you with the eyes my daughter lent her, it’s true.

BENEDICK

And I do with an eye of love requite her.

BENEDICK

And I see her also through the eyes of love.

LEONATO

25The sight whereof I think you had from me,
From Claudio and the Prince. But what’s your will?

LEONATO

And those eyes were endowed with sight by Claudio, the Prince, and me. But what did you want?

BENEDICK

Your answer, sir, is enigmatical.
But for my will, my will is your goodwill
May stand with ours, this day to be conjoined
30In the state of honorable marriage—
In which, good Friar, I shall desire your help.

BENEDICK

Sir, I’m puzzled by what you just said. But as far as what I want—I want you to give Beatrice and me your blessing to be married. That, good Friar, is where you come in.

LEONATO

My heart is with your liking.

LEONATO

Our wishes are aligned, then: I give you my blessing.

FRIAR FRANCIS

    And my help.
Here comes the Prince and Claudio.

FRIAR FRANCIS

And I’ll help you. Here comes the Prince and Claudio.
Enter DON PEDRO andCLAUDIO, and two or three others
DON PEDRO andCLAUDIO enter with two or three others.

DON PEDRO

Good morrow to this fair assembly.

DON PEDRO

Good morning to all these lovely people.

LEONATO

35Good morrow, Prince; good morrow, Claudio.
We here attend you. Are you yet determined
Today to marry with my brother’s daughter?

LEONATO

Good morning, Prince; good morning, Claudio. We’re waiting here for you. Are you still set on marrying my brother’s daughter?

CLAUDIO

I’ll hold my mind were she an Ethiope.

CLAUDIO