Much Ado About Nothing

by: William Shakespeare

  Act 2 Scene 3

page Act 2 Scene 3 Page 11

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BEATRICE

I took no more pains for those thanks than you take pains to
thank me. If it had been painful, I would not have come.

BEATRICE

I didn’t take any more pains bringing this message than you took pains in thanking me. If the job had been painful, I would not have come.

BENEDICK

210You take pleasure then in the message?

BENEDICK

So you took pleasure in bringing me this message?

BEATRICE

Yea, just so much as you may take upon a knife’s point and
choke a daw withal. You have no stomach, Signior. Fare you
well.

BEATRICE

Yes, as much pleasure as one might take in choking a bird at knifepoint. You don’t want to eat, sir? Goodbye, then.
Exit
She exits.

BENEDICK

Ha! “Against my will I am sent to bid you come in to
215dinner.” There’s a double meaning in that. “I took no more
pains for those thanks than you took pains to thank me.”
That’s as much as to say, “Any pains that I take for you is as
easy as thanks.” If I do not take pity of her, I am a villain.
If I do not love her, I am a Jew. I will go get her picture.

BENEDICK

Ha! “Against my will, I’ve been told to bring you in to dinner.” There’s a double meaning in that. “I didn’t take any more pains bringing this message than you took pains in thanking me.” That’s like saying, “Any thing I do for you is as easy as saying ‘thank you.’” If this doesn’t move me to take pity on her, I’m a horrible person. If I don’t love her, I’m completely

hard-hearted

According to anti-Semitic stereotypes, Jews were supposed to be hard-hearted and lacking a sense of charity.

hard-hearted
. I will go get her picture.
Exit
He exits.