The Two Gentlemen of Verona

by: William Shakespeare

  Act 3 Scene 2

page Act 3 Scene 2 Page 3

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PROTEUS

You have prevailed, my lord. If I can do it
By aught that I can speak in his dispraise,
She shall not long continue love to him.
But say this weed her love from Valentine,
50It follows not that she will love Sir Thurio.

PROTEUS

You’ve convinced me, my lord. If I do what I can to speak against him, she won’t love him much longer. But even if she stops loving Valentine, it doesn’t mean she will love Sir Thurio.

THURIO

Therefore, as you unwind her love from him,
Lest it should ravel and be good to none,
You must provide to bottom it on me;
Which must be done by praising me as much
55As you in worth dispraise Sir Valentine.

THURIO

So, as you break down her love for him, you must build it back up around me, so that it doesn’t come apart and become useless to everyone. You must do this by praising me as much as you dispraise Sir Valentine.

DUKE

And, Proteus, we dare trust you in this kind
Because we know, on Valentine’s report,
You are already Love’s firm votary
And cannot soon revolt and change your mind.
60Upon this warrant shall you have access
Where you with Sylvia may confer at large;
For she is lumpish, heavy, melancholy,
And, for your friend’s sake, will be glad of you,
Where you may temper her by your persuasion
65To hate young Valentine and love my friend.

DUKE

And, Proteus, we feel we can trust you with this task because we know, from what Valentine told us, that you’re already in love and can’t quickly fall out of love. For this reason you will be allowed to speak to Sylvia as you like. She is sad, sullen, and melancholy, and she’ll be happy to see you because you’re close to Valentine. Then you can shape her by your persuasion to hate young Valentine and love my friend, Sir Thurio.

PROTEUS

As much as I can do, I will effect.
But you, Sir Thurio, are not sharp enough;
You must lay lime to tangle her desires
By wailful sonnets, whose composèd rhymes
70Should be full-fraught with serviceable vows.

PROTEUS

I will do as much as I can. But you, Sir Thurio, aren’t doing enough to win her. To entice her and capture her desires, you must write sonnets whose well-crafted rhymes should be filled with vows of devotion.

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