The Two Gentlemen of Verona

William Shakespeare
No Fear Act 5 Scene 4
No Fear Act 5 Scene 4 Page 6

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PROTEUS and JULIA join hands.
Proteus and Julia join hands.

PROTEUS

Bear witness, heaven, I have my wish forever.

PROTEUS

As God as my witness, I have what I want forever.

JULIA

And I mine.

JULIA

And I as well.
Enter DUKE and THURIO, led by Outlaws
The DUKE and THURIO enter, led by outlaws.
A prize, a prize, a prize!
A prize! A prize! A prize!

VALENTINE

125Forbear, forbear, I say! it is my lord the Duke.

VALENTINE

Stop, stop, I say! This is my lord, the duke.
They release the Duke and Thurio.
Your Grace is welcome to a man disgraced,
Banishèd Valentine.
I welcome you, Your Grace, as a disgraced man, banished Valentine.

DUKE

Sir Valentine!

DUKE

Sir Valentine!

THURIO

[Advancing] Yonder is Sylvia, and Sylvia’s mine.

THURIO

(advancing) Sylvia is over there, and she’s mine.

VALENTINE

130[Drawing his sword] Thurio, give back, or else embrace thy death.
Come not within the measure of my wrath.
Do not name Sylvia thine; if once again,
Verona shall not hold thee. Here she stands.
Take but possession of her with a touch;
135I dare thee but to breathe upon my love.

VALENTINE

(drawing his sword) Thurio, move back, or else be prepared to die. Don’t come within a step of my anger. Do not call Sylvia yours. If you do it again, you’ll never be welcome in Verona. Go ahead, try to even touch her. I dare you to even breathe upon my love.

THURIO

Sir Valentine, I care not for her, I.
I hold him but a fool that will endanger
His body for a girl that loves him not.
I claim her not, and therefore she is thine.

THURIO

Sir Valentine, I don’t care about her. I consider anyone a fool who will endanger his life for a girl who doesn’t love him. I don’t claim her, and therefore she is yours.

DUKE

140The more degenerate and base art thou,
To make such means for her as thou hast done
And leave her on such slight conditions.
Now, by the honor of my ancestry,
I do applaud thy spirit, Valentine,
145And think thee worthy of an empress’ love.
Know then, I here forget all former griefs,
Cancel all grudge, repeal thee home again,
Plead a new state in thy unrivalled merit,
To which I thus subscribe: Sir Valentine,
150Thou art a gentleman, and well derived.
Take thou thy Sylvia, for thou hast deserved her.

DUKE

Then you are even more degenerate and awful, having made such great efforts to win her as you have and now leaving her for such minor reasons. Now, by the honor of my ancestors, I applaud your spirit, Valentine, and think you worthy of an empress’ love. I disregard all my former grievances with you, cancel all grudges, welcome you home again, and give you a clean record because of your unrivaled excellence, which I bear witness to. Sir Valentine, you are a gentleman and well-born. Take your Sylvia, for you have earned her.

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