The Two Gentlemen of Verona

William Shakespeare
No Fear Act 5 Scene 4
No Fear Act 5 Scene 4 Page 7

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VALENTINE

I thank Your Grace. The gift hath made me happy.
I now beseech you, for your daughter’s sake,
To grant one boon that I shall ask of you.

VALENTINE

I thank Your Grace. Your gift has made me happy. Now I beg you, for your daughter’s sake, to grant one favor that I’ll ask of you.

DUKE

155I grant it for thine own, whate’er it be.

DUKE

I grant it for your own sake, whatever it may be.

VALENTINE

These banished men, that I have kept withal,
Are men endued with worthy qualities.
Forgive them what they have committed here,
And let them be recalled from their exile.
160They are reformèd, civil, full of good,
And fit for great employment, worthy lord.

VALENTINE

These banished men, whom I have lived with, are men with good qualities. Forgive the crimes they’ve committed here, and declare an end to their exile. They are reformed, peaceful, goodhearted, and fit for great work, worthy lord.

DUKE

Thou hast prevailed; I pardon them and thee.
Dispose of them as thou know’st their deserts.
Come, let us go. We will include all jars
165With triumphs, mirth, and rare solemnity.

DUKE

You win: I pardon them and you. I’ll leave you in charge of them, since you know what they deserve. Come, let’s go. We’ll put all quarrels behind us with pageants, happiness, and festivities.

VALENTINE

And, as we walk along, I dare be bold
With our discourse to make Your Grace to smile.
What think you of this page, my lord?

VALENTINE

And, as we walk along, I’d like to be so bold as to tell you something to make Your Grace smile. What do you think of this young servant boy, my lord?

DUKE

I think the boy hath grace in him. He blushes.

DUKE

I think the boy has a feminine charm. Look, he’s blushing.

VALENTINE

170I warrant you, my lord, more grace than boy.

VALENTINE

I tell you, my lord, there’s more feminine charm in him than boy.

DUKE

What mean you by that saying?

DUKE

What do you mean by that?

VALENTINE

Please you, I’ll tell you as we pass along,
That you will wonder what hath fortunèd.—
Come, Proteus, ’tis your penance but to hear
175The story of your loves discoverèd.
That done, our day of marriage shall be yours:
One feast, one house, one mutual happiness.

VALENTINE

If it please you, I’ll tell you on the way, and you’ll be amazed at what’s been going on. Come, Proteus, it’s your punishment to hear the story of your two loves revealed. When that’s done, our wedding day will also be yours: one feast, one house, and one mutual happiness.

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