The Two Gentlemen of Verona

William Shakespeare
No Fear Act 2 Scene 4
No Fear Act 2 Scene 4 Page 2

Original Text

Modern Text

THURIO

How?

THURIO

Why?

SYLVIA

What, angry, Sir Thurio? Do you change color?

SYLVIA

What, are you angry, Sir Thurio? Is your face turning red?

VALENTINE

Give him leave, madam; he is a kind of chameleon.

VALENTINE

Leave him be, madame. He’s just a kind of chameleon.

THURIO

25That hath more mind to feed on your blood than live in your air.

THURIO

One that would rather feed off your blood, Valentine, than its usual diet of air.

VALENTINE

You have said, sir.

VALENTINE

So you say, sir.

THURIO

Ay, sir, and done too, for this time.

THURIO

Yes, sir, and it’ll be done, too.

VALENTINE

I know it well, sir; you always end ere you begin.

VALENTINE

I know it’s done, sir. You always end before you begin.

SYLVIA

A fine volley of words, gentlemen, and quickly shot off.

SYLVIA

A fine volley of words, gentlemen, and quickly fired.

VALENTINE

30’Tis indeed, madam, we thank the giver.

VALENTINE

It is indeed, madame. We have the giver to thank for that.

SYLVIA

Who is that, servant?

SYLVIA

And who is the giver, servant?

VALENTINE

Yourself, sweet lady, for you gave the fire. Sir Thurio borrows his wit from your ladyship’s looks, and spends what he borrows kindly in your company.

VALENTINE

Yourself, sweet lady, for you provided the spark that set it off. Sir Thurio gets his witty remarks from your ladyship’s good looks, and appropriately he spends what he borrows in your presence.

THURIO

Sir, if you spend word for word with me, I shall make your wit bankrupt.

THURIO

Sir, if you spar word for word with me, I shall make your wit dry up.

VALENTINE

I know it well, sir; you have an exchequer of words, and, I think, no other treasure to give your followers, for it appears, by their bare liveries, that they live by your bare words.

VALENTINE

I know it well, sir. You have a whole treasury of words, and, I think, no other treasure to give your servants, since it appears, by their ragged clothing, that they live by your worthless words alone.

SYLVIA

35No more, gentlemen, no more. Here comes my father.

SYLVIA

No more, gentlemen, no more. Here comes my father.
Enter the DUKE
The DUKE enters.

DUKE

Now, daughter Sylvia, you are hard beset.
Sir Valentine, your father is in good health.
What say you to a letter from your friends
Of much good news?

DUKE

Now, my daughter Sylvia, you are being assaulted. Sir Valentine, your father is healthy. What would you say to a letter from your friends filled with good news?

VALENTINE

40My lord, I will be thankful
To any happy messenger from thence.

VALENTINE

My lord, I would be thankful to anyone who brought good news from home.

DUKE

Know ye Don Antonio, your countryman?

DUKE

Do you know Don Antonio, who is also from your country?

VALENTINE

Ay, my good lord, I know the gentleman
To be of worth and worthy estimation,
45And not without desert so well reputed.

VALENTINE

Yes, my good lord. I know the gentleman is noble and has a good reputation, which is well-deserved.

Popular pages: The Two Gentlemen of Verona