The Two Gentlemen of Verona

William Shakespeare
No Fear Act 2 Scene 4
No Fear Act 2 Scene 4 Page 6

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VALENTINE

Now tell me, how do all from whence you came?

VALENTINE

Now tell me, how is everyone back home?

PROTEUS

Your friends are well and have them much commended.

PROTEUS

Your friends are well and send their regards.

VALENTINE

And how do yours?

VALENTINE

And how are your friends?

PROTEUS

115I left them all in health.

PROTEUS

They were all fine and healthy when I left.

VALENTINE

How does your lady, and how thrives your love?

VALENTINE

How is your lady, and is your love thriving?

PROTEUS

My tales of love were wont to weary you;
I know you joy not in a love discourse.

PROTEUS

My tales of love used to bore you. I know you don’t enjoy talking about love.

VALENTINE

Ay, Proteus, but that life is altered now.
120I have done penance for contemning Love,
Whose high imperious thoughts have punished me
With bitter fasts, with penitential groans,
With nightly tears, and daily heartsore sighs;
For, in revenge of my contempt of love,
125Love hath chased sleep from my enthrallèd eyes
And made them watchers of mine own heart’s sorrow.
O gentle Proteus, Love’s a mighty lord,
And hath so humbled me as I confess
There is no woe to his correction,
130Nor to his service no such joy on earth.
Now, no discourse, except it be of love;
Now can I break my fast, dine, sup, and sleep
Upon the very naked name of love.

VALENTINE

Yes, Proteus, but my life is different now. I have atoned for condemning Love. Overbearing thoughts of love punish me with bitter periods of not eating, remorseful groans, nightly tears, and daily lovesick sighs. In revenge for my contempt, Love keeps me awake and makes my eyes watch the woman responsible for my heart’s sorrow. Oh, kind Proteus, Love’s a powerful ruler and has so humbled me that I confess there is no sorrow as bad as his punishment and no joy equal to being in love. Now, speak no more unless it’s about love. Now I can eat again, have lunch and dinner, and sleep thinking of love.

PROTEUS

Enough. I read your fortune in your eye.
135Was this the idol that you worship so?

PROTEUS

Enough. I knew how you felt from the look in your eyes. Was that the woman you worship like an idol?

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