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The Two Gentlemen of Verona

William Shakespeare

  Act 2 Scene 7

page Act 2 Scene 7 Page 3

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LUCETTA

What fashion, madam, shall I make your breeches?

LUCETTA

In what style, madame, should I make your pants?

JULIA

50That fits as well as “Tell me, good my lord,
What compass will you wear your farthingale?”
Why, even what fashion thou best likes, Lucetta.

JULIA

Any style that won’t make men ask, “Tell me, good lord, how big around is the hoop in your hoop skirt?” Why, you should make them in whatever style you like best, Lucetta.

LUCETTA

You must needs have them with a codpiece, madam.

LUCETTA

You’ll need to wear a cup in your crotch, madame.

JULIA

Out, out, Lucetta! That will be ill-favored.

JULIA

Not so, Lucetta! That would be ugly.

LUCETTA

55A round hose, madam, now’s not worth a pin
Unless you have a codpiece to stick pins on.

LUCETTA

Tight leggings, madame, won’t be much of a disguise unless you wear a cup.

JULIA

Lucetta, as thou lov’st me, let me have
What thou think’st meet and is most mannerly.
But tell me, wench, how will the world repute me
60For undertaking so unstaid a journey?
I fear me it will make me scandalized.

JULIA

Lucetta, if you love me, let me have whatever you think is the most appropriate and fitting. But tell me, girl, what will people think of me for going on such a risky journey? I’m afraid it would make others think less of me.

LUCETTA

If you think so, then stay at home and go not.

LUCETTA

If that’s what you think, then stay home and don’t go.

JULIA

Nay, that I will not.

JULIA

No, I won’t stay.

LUCETTA

Then never dream on infamy, but go.
65If Proteus like your journey when you come,
No matter who’s displeased when you are gone.
I fear me he will scarce be pleased withal.

LUCETTA

Then go, and don’t worry what others might say. If Proteus is happy with your journey it doesn’t matter who’s displeased when they find out you’ve left. I’m afraid, though, that he won’t be pleased.

JULIA

That is the least, Lucetta, of my fear.
A thousand oaths, an ocean of his tears,
70And instances of infinite of love,
Warrant me welcome to my Proteus.

JULIA

That is the least of my fears, Lucetta. A thousand oaths, an ocean of tears he cried, and many examples of his infinite love for me guarantee that Proteus will welcome me.

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