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The Two Gentlemen of Verona

William Shakespeare
No Fear Act 3 Scene 1
No Fear Act 3 Scene 1 Page 3

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DUKE

Upon mine honor, he shall never know
That I had any light from thee of this.

DUKE

I swear on my honor he will never know I learned this information from you.

PROTEUS

50Adieu, my lord. Sir Valentine is coming.

PROTEUS

Goodbye, my lord. Sir Valentine is coming.
Exit PROTEUS
PROTEUS exits.
Enter VALENTINE hurrying elsewhere, concealing a rope ladder beneath his cloak
VALENTINE enters, hurrying to go somewhere and concealing a rope beneath his cloak.

DUKE

Sir Valentine, whither away so fast?

DUKE

Sir Valentine, what’s the rush?

VALENTINE

Please it your Grace, there is a messenger
That stays to bear my letters to my friends,
And I am going to deliver them.

VALENTINE

If you please, Your Grace, there is a messenger that waits to take my letters to my friends, and I am on my way to deliver them.

DUKE

55Be they of much import?

DUKE

Are they very important?

VALENTINE

The tenor of them doth but signify
My health and happy being at your court.

VALENTINE

In essence they describe how healthy and happy I am here in your kingdom.

DUKE

Nay then, no matter. Stay with me awhile.
I am to break with thee of some affairs
60That touch me near, wherein thou must be secret.
’Tis not unknown to thee that I have sought
To match my friend Sir Thurio to my daughter.

DUKE

No, then, they don’t matter. Stay with me a while. I want to tell you about some affairs that affect me personally, which you must keep secret. You’re surely aware that I have sought to match my friend Sir Thurio with my daughter.

VALENTINE

I know it well, my lord, and sure the match
Were rich and honorable. Besides, the gentleman
65Is full of virtue, bounty, worth, and qualities
Beseeming such a wife as your fair daughter.
Cannot your Grace win her to fancy him?

VALENTINE

I know that very well, my lord, and surely the match would be profitable and honorable. Besides, the gentleman is full of virtue, wealth, worth, and qualities fit for a wife such as your beautiful daughter. Can Your Grace not get her to want him for a husband?

DUKE

No, trust me. She is peevish, sullen, froward,
Proud, disobedient, stubborn, lacking duty,
70Neither regarding that she is my child
Nor fearing me as if I were her father.
And, may I say to thee, this pride of hers,
Upon advice, hath drawn my love from her;
And, where I thought the remnant of mine age
75Should have been cherished by her childlike duty,
I now am full resolved to take a wife,
And turn her out to who will take her in.
Then let her beauty be her wedding dower,
For me and my possessions she esteems not.

DUKE

No, trust me. She is irritable, sullen, difficult, proud, disobedient, stubborn, irresponsible, and neither does she care that she must obey me as my child nor does she fear me as her father. And, may I tell you, after thinking about it, this pride of hers has made me love her less. I once thought she would fulfill her duty and take care of me in my old age, but now I’ve resolved to find a new wife and marry my daughter off to whomever will take her. Her beauty will be her dowry, because she doesn’t value me or my possessions.

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