Glengarry Glen Ross

by: David Mamet

Williamson

Williamson, the "company man," is disliked by all of the salesmen because he is indifferent to their concerns. They accuse him of not being a "man" because his job is to implement orders given to him by his superiors. Also, the salesmen resent that Williamson's pay is not based on commission, claiming that he therefore does not know or understand the pressures that the salesmen face. Though Williamson's work as office manager is indeed quite different from sales, what the salesmen fail to recognize is that his motivations are identical to theirs. His job is secure, so it would be foolish of him to risk that by being more of a "man." Nonetheless, when he sees an opportunity to scam—bargaining with Levene to break company policy by selling him two leads for 100 dollars plus 20 percent of Levene's commissions—he is quite willing to put company loyalty aside.