Don Quixote

by: Miguel de Cervantes

The First Part, Chapters XXXVIII–XLV

1

I am extremely concerned, most beautiful lady, that you have fixed your amorous inclinations where it is impossible they should meet with that return which is due to your rank and qualifications; but, you ought not to impute of yielding my heart to any other but to her, who at first sight took absolute possession of my soul.

2

Don Quixote seeing that none of the travelers took the least notice of him, or made any answer to his defiance, was transported with rage and vexation; and if he could have recollected any law of chivalry, authorizing a knight-errant to undertake another enterprise, while he was under promise and oath, to abstain from any adventure, until that in which he was engaged already, was achieved; he would have assaulted them all together[.]

3

I say, under correction, and still with submission to better judgment, that the object now in dispute, which that worthy gentleman holds in his hand, is not only no barber’s basin, but also, as far from being one as black is from white, or falsehood from truth.