Election Day is November 3rd! Make sure your voice is heard

The Merchant of Venice

William Shakespeare
No Fear Act 1 Scene 2
No Fear Act 1 Scene 2 Page 2

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NERISSA

25Your father was ever virtuous, and holy men at their death have good inspirations. Therefore the lottery that he hath devised in these three chests of gold, silver, and lead, whereof who chooses his meaning chooses you, will no doubt never be chosen by any rightly but one who shall rightly love. But what warmth is there in your affection towards any of these princely suitors that are already come?

NERISSA

Your father was an extremely moral man, and religious people get odd ideas on their deathbeds. Your father’s idea was to have a game with three boxes. The suitor who can figure out whether to pick the gold, silver, or lead box will solve your father’s riddle—and that suitor’s the man for you. No one will ever choose the right box who doesn’t deserve your love. But tell me. Do you like any of the princely suitors who’ve come?

PORTIA

I pray thee, overname them. And as thou namest them, I will describe them. And according to my description, level at my affection.

PORTIA

Run through the list. As you name them I’ll describe them for you, and from my descriptions you can guess how I feel toward them.

NERISSA

First, there is the Neapolitan prince.

NERISSA

Well, first there was the prince from Naples.

PORTIA

Ay, that’s a colt indeed, for he doth nothing but talk of his horse, and he makes it a great appropriation to his own good parts that he can shoe him himself. I am much afeard my lady his mother played false with a smith.

PORTIA

Ah, yes, that stallion. All he talks about is his horse. He thinks it’s a great credit to his character that he can shoe a horse all by himself. I’m afraid his mother may have had an affair with a blacksmith.

NERISSA

Then there is the County Palatine.

NERISSA

Then there’s the Count Palatine.

PORTIA

He doth nothing but frown, as who should say, “An you will not have me, choose.” He hears merry tales and smiles not. I fear he will prove the weeping philosopher when he grows old, being so full of unmannerly sadness in his youth. I had rather be married to a death’s-head with a bone in his mouth than to either of these. God defend me from these two!

PORTIA

He does nothing but frown, as if he wants to say, “If you don’t want me, I don’t care.” He doesn’t even smile when he hears funny stories. If he’s so sad and solemn when he’s young, I can only imagine how much he’ll cry as an old man. No, I’d rather be married to a skull with a bone in its mouth than to either of those men. God protect me from these two!

NERISSA

How say you by the French lord, Monsieur le Bon?

NERISSA

What did you think about that French lord, Monsieur le Bon?