The Merchant of Venice

by: William Shakespeare

  Act 2 Scene 2

page Act 2 Scene 2 Page 6

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GOBBO

His master and he, saving your worship’s reverence, are scarce cater-cousins—

GOBBO

He and his master aren’t exactly friends—

LAUNCELOT

To be brief, the very truth is that the Jew, having done me wrong, doth cause me, as my father, being, I hope, an old man, shall frutify unto you—

LAUNCELOT

To be brief, the truth is that the Jew has done me wrong, and that forces me to—as my father, an old man, will inform you—

GOBBO

I have here a dish of doves that I would bestow upon your worship, and my suit is—

GOBBO

I have a present I’d like to give you, sir. And I want to request that—

LAUNCELOT

In very brief, the suit is impertinent to myself, as your worship shall know by this honest old man—and though I say it, though old man, yet poor man, my father—

LAUNCELOT

To make a long story short, the request is about me, as this good old man will tell you. Even though I’m his son and I’m the one saying it, this old man is a poor man—

BASSANIO

One speak for both. What would you?

BASSANIO

One of you do the talking. What do you want?

LAUNCELOT

Serve you, sir.

LAUNCELOT

To work for you, sir.

GOBBO

That is the very defect of the matter, sir.

GOBBO

That’s what we’re trying to say, sir.

BASSANIO

I know thee well. Thou hast obtained thy suit.
110Shylock thy master spoke with me this day,
And hath preferred thee, if it be preferment
To leave a rich Jew’s service, to become
The follower of so poor a gentleman.

BASSANIO

I know who you are. You can have what you want. I spoke with your master Shylock today, and he recommended you to me. If you want to leave a rich Jew to work for a poor gentleman, you’re welcome to.

LAUNCELOT

The old proverb is very well parted between my master Shylock and you, sir—you have “the grace of God,” sir, and he hath “enough.”

LAUNCELOT

Do you know the old proverb “The grace of God is enough,” sir? It could be divided between you and my boss Shylock—you have “the grace of God,” and he has “enough.”

BASSANIO

Thou speak’st it well.—Go, father, with thy son.—
Take leave of thy old master and inquire
My lodging out.—
120 (to followers)
    Give him a livery
More guarded than his fellows'. See it done.

BASSANIO

Nicely put.—Go with your son, old man.—Say goodbye to your old master and find your way to my house. (to attendants) Give him a uniform that’s a little nicer than the others. Make sure it gets done.