The Screwtape Letters

by: C.S. Lewis

The Patient

The Patient serves as the human stand-in for readers of the text. For this reason, many of the details of the Patient’s life his name, his job, his past, his actual words, and his physical description. rom Screwtape’s perspective, this kind of information is unnecessary when it comes to the task of winning the Patient’s soul to Hell. The laws of morality, The Screwtape Letters implies, are universal. They apply to all people as much as to the Patient. Like most people, the Patient is conflicted about how to behave. He asks himself questions about what is right and just, and tries to live according to the answers he determines for himself. He is intelligent and struggles with skepticism and a feeling of pride. He enjoys simple pleasures like solitary reading and walks in rural landscapes. The Patient is, from one point of view, the protagonist, or main character of the story. From another perspective, the Patient’s story is insignificant. In this way of reading the book, The ScrewtapeLetters about the universal truths of Christianity, and the general Christian project of winning eternal life in Heaven.