The Taming of the Shrew

by: William Shakespeare

  Act 4 Scene 5

page Act 4 Scene 5 Page 3

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PETRUCHIO

Why, how now, Kate! I hope thou art not mad.
This is a man—old, wrinkled, faded, withered—
45And not a maiden, as thou say’st he is.

PETRUCHIO

Why, dear me, Kate! I hope you haven’t lost your mind. This is not a maiden, as you say, but an old man—wrinkled, faded, and withered.

KATHERINE

Pardon, old father, my mistaking eyes
That have been so bedazzled with the sun
That everything I look on seemeth green.
Now I perceive thou art a reverend father.
50Pardon, I pray thee, for my mad mistaking.

KATHERINE

Sir, pardon my imperfect eyes, which have been so blinded by the sun that everything I look at appears

green

“Green” here means “young.”.

green
. Now I can see that you’re an elderly gentleman. Do forgive me for my crazy error.

PETRUCHIO

Do, good old grandsire, and withal make known
Which way thou travellest. If along with us,
We shall be joyful of thy company.

PETRUCHIO

Do, good old grandfather, and while you’re at it, tell us which way you’re traveling. If we’re all headed in the same direction, we’d love your company.

VINCENTIO

Fair sir, and you, my merry mistress,
55That with your strange encounter much amazed me,
My name is called Vincentio, my dwelling Pisa,
And bound I am to Padua, there to visit
A son of mine which long I have not seen.

VINCENTIO

Well, sir, and you, witty lady, who gave me quite a turn with your strange talk, my name is Vincentio, my hometown Pisa, and I am traveling to Padua to visit a son of mine whom I haven’t seen in a long while.

PETRUCHIO

What is his name?

PETRUCHIO

What is his name?

VINCENTIO

60Lucentio, gentle sir.

VINCENTIO

Lucentio, sir.

PETRUCHIO

Happily met, the happier for thy son.
And now by law as well as reverend age,
I may entitle thee my loving father.
The sister to my wife, this gentlewoman,
65Thy son by this hath married. Wonder not
Nor be grieved. She is of good esteem,
Her dowry wealthy, and of worthy birth.
Beside, so qualified as may beseem
The spouse of any noble gentleman.

PETRUCHIO

A fortunate coincidence—more fortunate for your son. I can now call you “father” in a legal sense, not just out of respect for your age. The sister of my wife, this lady here, is married to your son. And there’s no need for wonder or worry. His bride is well thought of, with a rich dowry and noble birth—a fit wife for any nobleman.