The Taming of the Shrew

William Shakespeare
No Fear Act 1 Scene 2
No Fear Act 1 Scene 2 Page 4

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GRUMIO

(to HORTENSIO) Nay, look you, sir, he tells you flatly what his mind is. Why, give him gold enough and marry him to a puppet or an aglet-baby, or an old trot with ne'er a tooth in her head, though she have as many diseases as two-and-fifty horses. Why, nothing comes amiss, so money comes withal.

GRUMIO

(to HORTENSIO) He’s certainly frank, isn’t he, sir? Give him enough money and he’ll be happy with a puppet, a paper doll, or a diseased old hag without a tooth in her head. If she’s got money, what does it matter?

HORTENSIO

Petruchio, since we are stepped thus far in,
65I will continue that I broached in jest.
I can, Petruchio, help thee to a wife
With wealth enough, and young and beauteous,
Brought up as best becomes a gentlewoman.
Her only fault, and that is faults enough,
70Is that she is intolerable curst,
And shrewd and froward, so beyond all measure
That, were my state far worser than it is,
I would not wed her for a mine of gold.

HORTENSIO

Petruchio, since the conversation’s gone this far, I may as well carry on with what I mentioned purely as a joke. I can help you find a wife who’s rich, young, beautiful, and reared in a manner fit for a gentlewoman. Her only flaw—and it’s a big one—is that she’s unbearable, a total witch, so much so that I wouldn’t think of marrying her myself, not even if I were in a worse fix than I am, not for a whole goldmine.

PETRUCHIO

Hortensio, peace. Thou know’st not gold’s effect.
75Tell me her father’s name, and ’tis enough;
For I will board her, though she chide as loud
As thunder when the clouds in autumn crack.

PETRUCHIO

Hush, Hortensio. You don’t know what money can buy. Tell me her father’s name—that’s all I need. I will go after her even if her scolding is as deafening as thunder in an autumn rainstorm.

HORTENSIO

Her father is Baptista Minola,
An affable and courteous gentleman.
80Her name is Katherina Minola,
Renowned in Padua for her scolding tongue.

HORTENSIO

Her father is Baptista Minola, a pleasant and courteous gentleman. Her name is Katherina Minola, famous throughout Padua for her scolding tongue.

PETRUCHIO

I know her father, though I know not her,
And he knew my deceasèd father well.
I will not sleep, Hortensio, till I see her,
85And therefore let me be thus bold with you
To give you over at this first encounter,
Unless you will accompany me thither.

PETRUCHIO

I don’t know her, but I know her father and he knew mine well. I won’t sleep until I see her, Hortensio. So I hope you’ll forgive my cutting short this first conversation of ours—unless you want to come with me.