The Merchant of Venice

by: William Shakespeare

Act II, scenes i-iv

1
Mislike me not for my complexion,
The shadowed livery of the burnished sun,
To whom I am a neighbor and near bread. (II.i.)
2
It is a wise father that knows his own child. (II.ii.)
3
Truth will come to light, murder cannot be hid long—a man’s son may, but in the end, truth will out.” (II.ii.)
4
Alack, what heinous sin is it in me
To be ashamed to be my father’s child?
But though I am a daughter to his blood,
I am not to his manners. O Lorenzo,
If thou keep promise, I shall end this strife, Become a Christian and thy loving wife. (II.iii.)
5
I know the hand; in faith, ‘tis a fair hand,
And whiter than the paper it writ on
If the fair hand that writ. (II.iv.)
6
If e’er the Jew her father come to heaven,
It will be for his gentle daughter’s sake; (II.iv.)
7

Mislike me not for my complexion, The shadowed livery of the burnished sun, To whom I am a neighbor and near bred. Bring me the fairest creature northward born, Where Phoebus' fire scarce thaws the icicles, And let us make incision for your love To prove whose blood is reddest, his or mine. (A II, s i)

8

In terms of choice I am not solely led By nice direction of a maiden’s eyes. Besides, the lottery of my destiny Bars me the right of voluntary choosing. But if my father had not scanted me And hedged me by his wit to yield myself His wife who wins me by that means I told you, Yourself, renownèd Prince, then stood as fair As any comer I have looked on yet For my affection. (A ii ,s i)

9

Signor Bassanio, hear me. If I do not put on a sober habit, Talk with respect and swear but now and then, Wear prayer books in my pocket, look demurely— Nay more. While grace is saying, hood mine eyes Thus with my hat, and sigh and say, “Amen”— Use all the observance of civility Like one well studied in a sad ostent To please his grandam, never trust me more. (A II, s ii)

10

Alack, what heinous sin is it in me To be ashamed to be my father’s child! But though I am a daughter to his blood, I am not to his manners. O Lorenzo, If thou keep promise, I shall end this strife, Become a Christian and thy loving wife. (A II, s iii)

11

I must needs tell thee all. She hath directed How I shall take her from her father’s house, What gold and jewels she is furnished with, What page’s suit she hath in readiness. If e'er the Jew her father come to heaven, It will be for his gentle daughter’s sake. And never dare Misfortune cross her foot Unless she do it under this excuse: That she is issue to a faithless Jew. Come, go with me . . . Fair Jessica shall be my torchbearer. (A II, s iv)