Tess of the d’Urbervilles

by: Thomas Hardy

Phase the Fourth: The Consequence, Chapters XXV–XXXI

Quotes Phase the Fourth: The Consequence, Chapters XXV–XXXI
He said that fate or Providence had thrown in his way a woman who possessed every qualification to be the helpmate of an agriculturist, and was decidedly of a serious turn of mind.
Yes, there was the pain of it. This question of a woman telling her story—the heaviest of crosses to herself—seemed but amusement to others. It was as if people should laugh at martyrdom.
She had not told. At the last moment her courage had failed her, she feared his blame for not telling him sooner; and her instinct of self-preservation was stronger than her candour.