Wuthering Heights

by: Emily Brontë

Chapters XXI–XXVI

Quotes Chapters XXI–XXVI
‘No, that man is not my son . . . But I have one, and you have seen him before too; and, though your nurse is in a hurry, I think both you and she would be the better for a little rest. Will you just turn this nab of heath, and walk into my house? You’ll get him earlier for the ease; and you shall receive a kind welcome.’
Mine has nothing valuable about it; yet I shall have the merit of making it go as far as such poor stuff can go. His had first-rate qualities, and they are lost . . . And the best of it is, Hareton is damnably fond of me! You’ll own that I’ve outmatched Hindley there.
My master, perceiving that she would not take his word for her uncle-in-law’s evil disposition, gave a hasty sketch of his conduct to Isabella, and the manner in which Wuthering Heights became his property…Miss Cathy—conversant with no bad deeds except her own slight acts of disobedience, . . . was amazed at the blackness of spirit that could brood on and cover revenge for years, and deliberately prosecute its plans without a visitation of remorse.
I’ve been to Wuthering Heights, Ellen, and I’ve never missed going a day since you fell ill . . . I was at the Heights by half-past six, and generally stayed till half-past eight, and then galloped home. It was not to amuse myself that I went: I was often wretched all the time.
‘Why did he wish to see me? . . . It’s just as if it were a task he was compelled to perform—this interview—for fear his father should scold him. But I’m hardly going to come to give Mr. Heathcliff pleasure; whatever reason he may have for ordering Linton to undergo this penance. And, though I’m glad he’s better in health, I’m sorry he’s so much less pleasant, and so much less affectionate to me.’