Julius Caesar

by: William Shakespeare

Act I, Scene ii

1

Beware the ides of March. . . . He is a dreamer. Let us leave him. Pass!

2

Cassius, Be not deceived. If I have veiled my look, I turn the trouble of my countenance Merely upon myself. Vexèd I am Of late with passions of some difference, Conceptions only proper to myself, Which give some soil perhaps to my behaviors.

3

Why, man, he doth bestride the narrow world Like a Colossus, and we petty men Walk under his huge legs and peep about To find ourselves dishonorable graves. Men at some time are masters of their fates. The fault, dear Brutus, is not in our stars But in ourselves, that we are underlings.

4

That you do love me, I am nothing jealous. What you would work me to, I have some aim. How I have thought of this and of these times I shall recount hereafter. For this present, I would not, so with love I might entreat you, Be any further moved. What you have said I will consider, what you have to say I will with patience hear, and find a time Both meet to hear and answer such high things.

5

Thy honorable mettle may be wrought From that it is disposed. Therefore it is meet That noble minds keep ever with their likes, For who so firm that cannot be seduced? Caesar doth bear me hard, but he loves Brutus. If I were Brutus now and he were Cassius, He should not humor me.