Great Expectations

by: Charles Dickens

Chapters 40–46

Quotes Chapters 40–46
1

All this time I had never been able to consider my own situation, nor could I do so yet. I had not the power to attend to it. I was greatly dejected and distressed, but in an incoherent wholesale sort of way. As to forming any plan for the future, I could as soon have formed an elephant.

2

“I mustn’t see my gentleman a footing it in the mire of the streets; there mustn’t be no mud on his boots. My gentleman must have horses, Pip. Horses to ride, and horses to drive, and horses for his servant to ride and drive as well. Shall colonists have horses (and blood ‘uns, if you please, good Lord!) and not my London gentleman? No, no.”

3

“I am informed by a person named Abel Magwitch, that he is the benefactor so long unknown to me… I am not so unreasonable, sir, as to think you at all responsible for my mistakes and wrong conclusions; but I always supposed it was Miss Havisham.”

4

But all this time, why I was not to go home, and what had happened at home, and when I should go home, and whether Provis was safe at home, were questions occupying my mind so busily, that one might have supposed there could be no more room in it for any other theme. Even when I thought of Estella, … even then I was pursuing, here and there and everywhere, the caution Don’t go home.

5

In short, I was always full of fears for the rash man who was in hiding. Herbert had sometimes said to me that he found it pleasant to stand at one of our windows after dark, when the tide was running down, and to think that it was flowing, with everything it bore, towards Clara. But I thought with dread that it was flowing towards Magwitch, and that any black mark on its surface might be his pursuers, going swiftly, silently, and surely, to take him.