Dracula

by: Bram Stoker

Companion Texts

Further study Companion Texts

Tucker, Abigail. “The Great New England Vampire Panic.” Smithsonian Magazine, October 2012. Available at http://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/the-great-new-england-vampire-panic-36482878/

This article offers a historical account of the “vampire panic” that swept through nineteenth-century New England, motivating numerous exhumations of corpses suspected to be vampires. It describes several historical cases of suspected vampires, and reflects on possible reasons for the panic during this period in America.

Guardian Books Podcast: Dracula’s Literary legacy. Presented by Claire Armitstead. Available at https://www.theguardian.com/books/audio/2012/apr/27/dracula-horror-bram-stoker-podcast

This 35-minute podcast offers perspectives on Dracula’s legacy in literature and popular culture, 100 years after the death of Bram Stoker. The speakers are a varied group of scholars, writers, and vampire experts, including Stoker’s great-grandnephew Dacre Stoker.

Whitmore, Greg. “Dracula Film Posters: In Pictures.” The Guardian, December 2012. Available at https://www.theguardian.com/culture/gallery/2012/dec/15/bram-stoker-dracula-in-pictures

This collection of poster images shows how Dracula has been reimagined in the twentieth century, on both the stage and in film adaptations of the novel. The caption for each poster offers a brief description of its source.

Cashion, Deirdre. Interview with Dacre Stoker. The Irish Independent. Available at

https://soundcloud.com/dee_cashion/dacre-stoker-interview

In this brief podcast interview, Bram Stoker’s great-grandnephew, Dacre Stoker, speaks about his discovery of the author’s long-lost journal (published in 2013 as The Lost Journal of Bram Stoker). He speaks about the contents of the journal, as well as the process of discovering and editing it for publication with scholar Elizabeth Miller.

Acocella, Joan. “In the Blood: Why Do Vampires Still Thrill?” The New Yorker, March 2009. Available at http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2009/03/16/in-the-blood

This brief article contextualizes Stoker’s Dracula with regard to historical belief in vampires, and charts the development of vampire fiction from the Romantic period to present day. It also traces the evolution of scholarship on vampires, and on Dracula specifically. Finally, the article suggests possible reasons for Dracula’s enduring power, including its narrative structure and its psychological perceptiveness.

Mah, Ann. “Where Dracula Was Born, and It’s Not Transylvania.” The New York Times, September 2015. Available at https://www.nytimes.com/2015/09/13/travel/bram-stoker-dracula-yorkshire.html

This article offers a window into the geography and history of Whitby, England, where Stoker began writing Dracula and where he set some of the novel’s action. It discusses Stoker’s month-long visit to Whitby, and includes photographs of relevant local sights like Whitby Abbey and the harbor.

Frost, Adam, and Zhenia Vasiliev. “How to Tell You’re Reading a Gothic Novel.” Produced for The Guardian, May 2014. Available at http://www.adam-frost.com/gothic-page.html

This infographic introduces the genre of the Gothic novel, by listing some of its hallmark characteristics and describing how they appear in several major Gothic novels from the eighteenth- and nineteenth-centuries (including Dracula).