Pride and Prejudice

by: Jane Austen

Chapters 35–42

1
The situation of your mother’s family, though objectionable, was nothing in comparison of that total want of propriety.
2
She grew absolutely ashamed of herself. Of neither Darcy nor Wickham, could she think, without feeling that she had been blind, partial, prejudiced, absurd.
3
I have courted prepossession and ignorance and driven reason away, where either were concerned. Till this moment I never knew myself.
4
In her own past behaviour, there was a constant source of vexation and regret; and in the unhappy defects of her family, a subject of yet heavier chagrin.
5
Lydia will never be easy until she has exposed herself in some public place or other, and we can never expect her to do it with so little expense or inconvenience to her family as under the present circumstances.